CWD and Cervidae Regulations in North America

Updated as of October 2021

For questions or table updates, contact Melinda Cosgrove at cosgrovem1@michigan.gov or 517-336-5043. Click the green "+" to expand information for that area. 

 
State/Province Agency (with jurisdiction over captive cervids) and Contacts Standard Regulations (listed only if different or in addition to those listed in Summary below) Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Regulations for Captive Cervids New Regulations in Development CWD Testing for Captive Cervids CWD Testing for Free-ranging Cervids Baiting Banned? Feeding Banned? Ban on Importation and Movement of Cervid Carcasses/Parts or Animal Products? CWD Found in Captive Cervids CWD Found in Free-Ranging Cervids
AAA - Summary In thirteen states and five of the Canadian provinces listed, the state's Department of Agriculture, or equivalent, has jurisdiction over captive cervids.  The Department of Fish and Game, or equivalent has jurisdiction in eleven states and five of the provinces listed.  Captive cervid farms are jointly managed by both agencies in twenty-six states and one of the eleven listed Canadian provinces. In Canada, The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), manages the national CWD control program for captive cervids, and the national standards and audit portions of the voluntary herd certification program (VHCP). Standard Regulations are: 1)Certification of Veterinary Inspection (health certificate),  2)Import or Entry Permit, 3)Negative brucellosis test (within 30-60 days of import), 4)Negative tuberculosis test (within 30-90 days of import) Thirty states and seven of the Canadian provinces listed prohibit the importation of live cervids from any county, region and/or state where CWD has been detected; have regulations that can prohibit importation from CWD areas; require that the state exporting the cervid be enrolled in an official CWD monitoring and certification program; and/or require only that there has been no diagnosis of CWD in the originating herd or imported cervid.  Twenty states and three of the Canadian provinces listed have banned all cervid imports. One of the Canadian provinces listed have no specific rules listed. In Canada, national disease control of CWD falls primarily under the Health of Animals Act, and Health of Animals Regulations. This column lists newly adopted or in development regulations regarding CWD in the States and Canada.  The CFIA has updated its national CWD disease control program, and is updating the national standards for the vountary herd certification program. CFIA's federal import requirements for live cervids from the USA were updated in October of 2017. Forty-four states and nine of the Canadian provinces listed perform some degree of captive cervid testing for CWD where captive cervids are legal. In addition, a portion of the surveillance testing and all confirmatory testing from across Canada takes place at CFIA's national reference lab for CWD. Forty-nine states and ten of the Canadian provinces listed perform some level of CWD testing on wild cervids. Of those seven states and one province perform testing for targeted animals only. Currently, a portion of the surveillance and all confirmatory testing from across Canada takes place at CFIA's national reference lab for CWD. Twenty-three states and three Canadian provinces do not allow the baiting of cervids. Sixteen states and three provinces have certain restrictions on baiting.  Eleven states and one of the Canadian provinces listed do not allow the feeding of cervids and nineteen states and three provinces have certain restrictions. Twenty-four states and six provinces ban the import of hunter-harvested cervid carcasses and certain parts from any state or province. Twenty-two states ban the import of cervid carcasses and certain parts only from states or provinces where CWD has been detected. Four states and five provinces have no particular ban in place. See each state or province for specific rules. CWD has been found in captive cervids in eighteen states and three Canadian provinces (CO, IL, IA, KS,  MI, MN, MO, MT, NE, NY, OH, OK, PA, SD, TX, UT, WV, WI, Alberta, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. CWD has been found in free -ranging cervids in twenty-five states and two Canadian provinces (AR, CO, IA, IL, KS, MD, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, ND, NE, NM, NY, OH, PA,  SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WI, WV, WY, Alberta and Saskatchewan).
Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.                                                 Contacts: Chris Cook 205-339-5716 chris.cook@dcnr.alabama.gov (wild cervids); Lt. Michael East 334-242-3467                          michael.east@dcnr.alabama.gov (captive cervids)                      Cervid imports have not been allowed since 1973.  It is illegal to have penned deer, many high fenced areas do exist. Licensed game breeders can buy and sell deer with permit, but no importation is allowed.  Approximately 13 "grandfathered" propagators are permitted to keep, breed, and release deer into an enclosure.  Permitted propagators can't add animals to their captive facility from the wild.  Propagation permits are no longer issued.        Cervid imports have not been allowed since 1973. CWD Strategic Surveillance and Response Plan updated February 2021 Mandatory testing of animals 12 months of age or older that die in captive herds. Sampling began in 2001.  As of 9-30-21, 2,140 free-range deer tested in FY21.  Samples include target animals, road kills, hunter harvested animals, and animals that die in licensed game breeder facilities.  No positive animals have been found to date. Plans are to continue surveillance efforts.  Education efforts have also made the public more aware of the need to report deer that may be doing poorly or may not be acting normally.  Those deer are submitted for testing as well.  Mandatory testing of animals 12 months of age or older that die in captive herds.  As of September 30, 2021, 458 captive deer tested in FY21. No, as long as the hunter has a Baiting Privilege License.  This is required for all hunters (no exemptions) using bait while hunting deer or feral pigs. No The importation of body parts of any member of the family Cervidae, including but not limited to deer, elk, moose and caribou, is prohibited from all states, territories, or possessions of the United States of America.  Importation of body parts is also prohibited from all foreign countries.  The family Cervidae includes but is not limited to white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, moose, caribou, fallow deer, axis deer, sika deer, red deer, and reindeer.  This regulation shall not apply to importation of:  meat that has been completely deboned; cleaned skull plates with attached antlers, if no visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; raw capes or hides, if no visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; upper canine teeth, if no root structure or other soft tissue is present; and finished taxidermy products or tanned hides.  No No
Alaska* Dept of Natural Resources-Division of Agriculture responsible for game farm permits and inspecting fencing.  Dept of Environmental Conservation-Division of Environmental Health responsible for animal health regulations.  Dept of Fish & Game-Division of Wildlife Conservation responsible for free-ranging cerivds. Contact:  Department of Environmental Conservation (captive cervids) Dr. Bob Gerlach Bob.Gerlach@alaska.gov, ADF&G-Division of Wildlife Conservation (free-ranging cervids) Kimberlee Beckmen, kimberlee.beckmen@alaska.gov Imported cervids must have a certificate of veterinary inspection, state import permit, individual animal id traceable to the premises of origin, originate from a herd designated by a state as free of brucellosis and tuberculosis or has tested negative for brucellosis and tuberculosis not earlier than 60 days before importation , originate from a CWD low risk herd as defined by 9 CFR 55.23 (five years of surveillance) that is enrolled in an official CWD monitoring and surveillance program that is consistent with 9 CFR 55.23.     Imported cervids must have a certificate of veterinary inspection, state import permit, individual animal id traceable to the premises of origin, negative TB and Brucellosis, originate from a CWD low risk herd  as defined by 9 CFR 55.23 (five years of surveillance) that is enrolled in an official CWD monitoring and surveillance program consistent with 9 CFR 55.23.    Intrastate movement of captive cervids rerquires permit from State Veterinarian. Voluntary Certification Program that is consistent with 9 CFR 55.23 (5 years to achieve CWD low risk certified status) has been established and supports testing for captive cervids. Targeted and voluntary hunter harvested surveillance of deer and elk began in 2003 with moose and caribou targeted surveillance added in 2004.  Hunter harvest surveillance discontinued in 2009. Targeted surveillance scaled back to within 5 miles of an elk facility in March 2012. CWD surveillance other than clinical suspects has been discontinued. In 2013 -1966 SBT deer, 89 elk, 119 caribou and 740 moose have been tested, all negative for CWD. Surveillance discontinued in 2014. Only clinical suspects or necropsy cases tested.
 
No baiting allowed. No feeding allowed. The importation of whole carcasses and certain carcass parts from cervidae (including mule deer, white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer and elk) and other CWD susceptible species into the state of Alaska is banned.  Importation of carcass parts from such species is restricted to: de-boned meat (cut and wrapped, commercially or privately); quarters or other meat portions with no portion of the spinal column (including dorsal root ganglion) or head attached; processed meat (cut and wrapped commercially or privately); hides with no heads attached; clean and disinfected skull plates; antlers with no meat or tissue attached; clean and disinfected whole skull (European mount) - no meat or nervous tissue (brain, cranial nerves) attached; and teeth (upper canines or buglers). No No
Arizona Game and Fish Department. Contact: Anne Justice-Allen, 623-236-7351, ajustice-allen@azgfd.gov Effective 30 August 2003, No cervid can be imported into Arizona except for zoos under specific conditions.  Effective 30 August 2003, No cervid can be imported into Arizona except for zoos under specific conditions. Cervids held under special license must be identified with a microchip or tattoo as prescribed by rule; census of all cervids on property (births, deaths, and exportation) must be included in the report. Any cervid that dies must be submitted for CWD testing within 72-hours of death. Movement of cervids within the state is regulated. The Department is authorized to seize, destroy, and dispose of any cervid (at the owner's expense) held illegally. Rules related to CWD were instituted on 30 August 2003. A new rule took effect 1 July 2013. Additional rules regarding carcass importation and use of bait have been instituted since 2013 The holder of a private game farm or zoo license is required to submit all cervids over one year of age that die or are killed for CWD testing. This rulemaking also requires permanent marking of all animals on site and annual reports providing information on births, deaths, or other transactions involving captive cervids. As of April 2021, CWD has not been detected in Arizona. The Department continues to conduct surveillance using a cooperative program and with hunters, taxidermists, and meat processors for sampling harvested deer as well as collecting samples from road killed and abnormal animals. Yes, according to Article 3 R12-4-303, edible baits and cervid urine based attractants may not be used to take deer or elk. normal livestock feeding and supplementation is exempted. Yes, according to Title 13-2927, it is unlawful to intentionally, knowingly or recklessly feed, attract, or otherwise entice wildlife into an area (except for tree squirrels and birds). Yes, according to Article 3 R12-4-305, out-of-state hunters can only bring in boneless portion of meat or packaged meat, finished taxidermy mounts, skulls without any soft tissue (including velvet), teeth (whistlers), and cleaned hides. A private game farm license holder may transport a cervid lawfully killed or slaughtered at the license holder's game farm to a licensed meat processor. An individual may possess or transport only the following portions of a cervid lawfully killed or slaightered at a private game farm: boneless portions of meat or packaged meat, finished taxidermy mounts, skulls without any soft tissue (including velvet), teeth (whistlers), and cleaned hides. No No
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission regulates imports relating to wildlife, Livestock & Poultry Commission regulates imports relating to livestock.  A Memorandum of Agreement between the two agencies delegates final permitting authority to Game and Fish.  Contact: Dr. Jenn Ballard, AGFC 501-223-6366; jennifer.ballard@agfc.ar.gov 09/26/02: Total ban on importation of live cervids. 4/18/13: Restrictions on importation of cervid carcasses from all locations outside of Arkansas.  CWD-related Widlife/Hunting Regulations available at https://www.agfc.com/en/hunting/big-game/deer/cwd/cwd-regulations/.   09/26/02: Total ban on importation of live cervids. A 2021-2025 CWD Management and Responce Plan was approved and is available at:  https://www.agfc.com/en/hunting/big-game/deer/cwd/.   All captive cervids that die from illness, slaughter, hunting or any other cause shall be reported within 24 hours and submitted for CWD testing. CWD was identified in February 2016 in both white-tailed deer and elk populations.  Spatial distribution and apparent prevalance monitoring continue inside the CWD Management Zone.  Drop off containers for free CWD testing are available statewide for voluntary testing of white-tailed deer.  Mandatory CWD testing for hunter harvested elk.    Baiting is seasonally restricted inside the CWD Management Zone. Baiting is not allowed on public land statewide. Private land baiting outside of the management zone is unrestricted. Feeding of wildlife is banned inside the CWD Management Zone and on public land statewide. Feeding of wildlife on private land is unrestricted outside of the CWD Management Zone. Not allowed to import, transport or possess any portion of a cervid carcass from any area outside the boundaries of Arkansas except: antlers and/ or antlers attached to clean skull plates or cleaned skulls (where no meat or tissues are attached to skull), meat with bones removed, cleaned teeth, finished taxidermy products, hides, and tanned products. Regulation also applies to any cervid taken from a captive facility or from within any enclosure regardless of state. Regulations also  to carcasses of deer/elk harvested from within the state's CWD Management Zone. no Yes, elk and WTD
California* Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW) has authority over all captive cervids and issues the permits required for possession.  Department of Food & Agriculture (DFA) becomes the lead over captive cervids only if a disease outbreak occurs which could impact livestock (TB and brucellosis).  Contact: Brandon Munk (CDFW), 916-358-1194, brandon.munk@wildlife.ca.gov All  cervids are considered "detrimental species" under California's restricted species laws (CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 671) and permitting requirements are strictly regulated by the CA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife following prior written approval from the Wildlife Investigations Lab. Native deer farms are prohibited. Fallow deer are striclty regulated under a fallow deer farming permit. All cervids permitted for importation require specific pre-entry disease testing and/or herd testing/certification. No cervids allowed for import that originate from CWD positive states, or have a history of contact with captive elk, or any other potential risk. Regulation banning the import of hunter-harvested cervids adopted in June 2003 (CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 712).  Citations are being issued to hunters not compliant with this regulation, and meat processors are not allowed to accept out-of-state whole cervid carcasses not compliant with regulation. CWD is listed by the CA Department of Food & Agriculture as a reportable disease.   A slaughter surveillance program for farmed fallow deer has been developed. Developed surveillance in 1999 for hunter killed, road kill and mortalities investigated by the Wildlife Investigations Laboratory.  Approximately 5,000 deer and elk have been tested.  Currently, California is developing a risk-based surveillance strategy and increasing surveillance sampling statewide.  CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 251.3, effective 09/01/79: Prohibition against taking resident game birds and mammals by the aid of bait. CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 251.3, effective 07/01/96: Prohibition against feeding big game mammals. CA Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 712, effective 6/05/03:   Ban on importation of hunter harvested deer and elk carcasses. Except, portions of meat with no part of spinal column or head attached; hides or capes with no spinal column, brain  tissue, or head attached; clean skull plates, no brain tissue may be present; antlers with no meat or tissue attached; finished taxidermy mounts with no meat or tissue attached; and upper canines. No No
Colorado Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) regulates wildlife imports and has authority over commercially raised mule deer and other commercially raised wildlife species.  The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has authority over alternative livestock (fallow deer and elk).  Authority over possession, importation, and movement of alternative livestock (elk and fallow deer) is shared, and CWD management in alternative livestock facilities requires CDA and CPW approval of the herd plan. Moratorium on new licensing of cervid ranches by CPW; CDA is licensing new alternative livestock facilities.  Contact: Mary Wood, CPW, 970-472-4473, mary.wood@state.co.us Regulations: Krista Heiner, CPW 303-866-3203 x4609, krista.heiner@state.co.us  CDA: Wayne East, 303-869-9149, wayne.east@state.co.us All cervids must be free of infectious and contagious disease; must be treated for internal/external parasites within 21 days prior to entry, must be marked with USDA official ear tag, and originate from a bovine TB-free accredited herd.  All elk must test negative for evidence of red deer hybridization. 60 months CWD-free status from qualifying surveillance program required for importation and intrastate movement of captive cervids. CPW and CDA jointly review all requests for cervid movement - both agencies must approve; CDA issues the movement/importation authorization. NA Mandatory surveillance required on any captive cervid death (>12 months of age) whether natural death, slaughter or hunt park kill (fresh and fixed tissue).   CWD testing available statewide for successful deer and elk hunters for a fee. Fee waived for any mandatory submission. Director has authority to administratively impose mandatory hunter testing by unit to meet sampling objectives. Mandatory hunter testing rotates around the state each year to achieve adequate sample sizes for monitoring in selected population units. Between 2017 and 2021 all deer populations in the state were sampled via rotating mandatory testing with roughly 7,000 samples tested per year. For current testing information please refer to the following site:  https://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/ResearchCWD-Submission.aspx Big Game baiting illegal. Feeding of certain wildlife species, including big game, is illegal.  In January 2008 the Wildlife Commission struck the regulation on transportation of cracass parts and encouraged an educational effort focused on disposal of carcass trim. Yes, in elk Yes, in mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, and moose.
Connecticut* Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Agriculture No cervid imports allowed. No movements within state without permit. No cervid imports allowed. All use of natural deer urine products is prohibited, particularly for the purposes of taking or attempting to take or attract deer, or for the surveillance or scouting of deer.   Capitve cervid owners required to (a) have 2 forms of tagging and (b) have perimeter fence specifications. WTD surveillance program to perform random testing on hunter harvested cervids and road kills from High-risk populations statewide. Hunters are allowed to use bait in 2 out of 12 Deer Management Zones. NA Ban on importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk from CWD endemic states (unless deboned). No No
Delaware* Department of Agriculture has jurisdiction over all exotic cervids, while the Division of Fish and Wildlife has jurisdiction over white-tailed deer.  Contact: Joe Rogerson, 302-735-3600 No cervid imports allowed from any state. No movements within state without permit. No cervid imports allowed from any state. No movements within state without permit. Currently being reviewed: A regulation banning the use of natural deer urine. A regulation banning the importation of high-risk deer parts from deer harvested within a high-fenced facility.  Testing is mandatory for all new captive cervid facilities in Delaware. Mandatory testing of facilities that were grandfathered in before the ban on captive cervid facilities bringing deer in from outside of the state and banning all white-tailed deer facilities will be implemented in the near future. In 2003, began testing hunter harvested WTD.  Collected 200+ samples within each of the 3 counties during the 2005-06 through the present hunting seasons.  This sampling intensity yields a 99% probability of detecting the disease if it is present in at least 1% of the population. Baiting allowed on private land. NA Carcasses from areas as determined by the Division of Fish & Wildlife  where CWD has been reported must be processed prior to entering the state.  No spinal cord tissues or brain tissues allowed from these areas.  Cleaned skulls, hides, antlers, etc are permitted. No No
Florida* Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) regulates possession of captive cervids, Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (FDACS) handles movement permits and health requirements. Contact: Cory Morea, Cory.Morea@MyFWC.com, 850-617-9553 Effective September 6, 2013, No cervid imports by executive order.  Effective November 11, 2013, No cervid imports by rule.  Exceptions allowed for zoos and temporary possession of Reindeer. No person shall receive, possess, transport, or carry into the state by any means live deer, elk or other species of the family Cervidae originating from out-of-state unless permitted pursuant to Chapter 68A-6 and as provided herein. (1) Zoos that meet or exceed all applicable Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) accreditation standards which are adopted and incorporated herein by reference, are authorized to receive cervids from out-of-state (except for white-tailed deer) from aNother facility that meets or exceeds all applicable AZA accreditation standards. (2) Any person is authorized to receive Reindeer (Rangifer tarandas) temporarily, for No longer than 90 days, provided that the reindeer being received have Not originated from or been possessed at a premises or facility located in a county or a county adjoining a county where CWD has been documented, and are Not located at a premises or facility in Florida with other species of the family Cervidae.
Cervids being moved shall Not be commingled with cervids from other sources during transfer. No person shall violate Chapter 5C-26, F.A.C.
None. Testing of captive cervids is voluntary.  Implemented active surveillance of hunter-killed and road-killed deer and passive surveillance of symptomatic wild deer in summer 2002. As of June 2021, over 16,600 deer have been tested, 1,150 from passive surveillance and 15,350 from active surveillance.  No positives have been detected.  FWC is currently testing approximately 2,000 free-ranging deer per year.  Additional information is available at www.MyFWC.com/CWD No ban. No ban. Effective July 1 2021, people may import into Florida: deboned meat; finished taxidermy mounts; antlers; hides; and skulls, skull caps and teeth if all soft tissue has been removed. In addition, the rules allow an exception for deer harvested from a property in Georgia or Alabama if such property is bisected by the Florida state line and is under the same ownership. However, the new rule amendments do not include the permit option allowed under a FWC executive order to import whole deer or high-risk parts from properties in Georgia or Alabama. No No
Georgia The Department of Natural Resources and Department of Agriculture have joint authority over deer farms.  Farmed deer are restricted to fallow, sika, and red deer, elk, caribou and their hybrids. White-tailed deer are not included as farmed deer.  Pursuant to OCGA 4-4-170 through 181, the Department of Agriculture administers the deer farming license and provisions relating to health requirements, humane treatment and slaughter.  Also, the DNR inspects facilities prior to Ag approval and issuance of deer farming license.  Further, the Department of Natural Resources has jurisdiction over escpaed farmed deer.  Pursuant to OCGA 27-5-1 through 12 (Wild Animal Act), the DNR has authority over wild animals, which include the cervid species that can be legally farmed in Georgia.  Thus, anyone holding any cervid species is required to have a wild animal license to legally possess a cervid other than white-tailed deer.
Contact: Charlie Killmaster, State Deer Biologist, (706) 557-3350, charlie.killmaster@dnr.ga.gov
No live deer imports allowed. The Georgia General Assembly passed legislation in 2006 that prohibits the importation of any live cervid.  Prior, the Department had promulgated regulations that prohibited the importation of any live cervid. NA All farmed deer over six months of age that die other than by slaughter must have samples submitted to an approved veterinary diagnosis laboratory for Chronic Wasting Disease testing to engage in commerce of captive cervids. This surveillance may be at the expense of the owner or agent unless supplementary funds are made available. Farmed deer slaughtered in licensed meat establishments must be made available for sample collection and submission to an approved veterinary diagnostic laboratory for Chronic Wasting Disease testing. This surveillance may be at the expense of the owner or agent unless supplementary funds are made available. DNR began a wildlife surveillance program in fall 2002. In 2002-2003, we target tested 317 cervids limited to 6 areas considered to be at greatest risk due to proximity of captive cervid facilities. Additionally, we tested 100 cervids as a part of standard health monitoring. In 2003-2004, program was expanded to statewide and approximately 1,300 samples are collected each year under a risk-based surveillance strategy. CWD has not been detected at this time. Additional information is available at www.georgiawildlife.com Baiting deer is legal statewide on private lands, but prohibited on all public lands. The DNR Board may by rule or regulation restrict the feeding, baiting, or hunting of deer and/or feral hogs upon, over, around or near such feed or bait in any county and any adjoining county, upon documented occurrence of a communicable disease in deer in such county.  No person shall feed, bait or hunt deer and/or feral hogs in violation of any such restriction imposed. It is unlawful to import or possess a whole cervid carcass or cervid carcass part from any state having a documented case of a cervid infected with chronic wasting disease, except for one or more of the following parts: (1) Boned out meat; (2) Portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; (3) Hide with no heads attached; (4) Clean skull plates with antlers attached; (5) Clean antlers; (6) Finished taxidermy heads: and (7) Clean upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories) No No
Hawaii Department of Agriculture has authority over import, possession and transfer of all cervids.  Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife regulates possession of introduced Axis and Black-tailed deer on State lands.  Contact: State Game Management Specialist, 808-587-4159 Special permit for elk and axis deer for commercial use.  Black-tailed deer and mule deer are permitted for research and exhibition by special permit.  White-tailed deer not allowed.  Hawaii has only one captive cervid farm (elk) at this time. Wild animal licenses for cervids are conditioned to restrict intrastate movement and require participation in USDA's CWD program for movement. Permits issued on case by case basis. No entry permits for elk or deer will be considered unless they originated from a herd that has been CWD monitored for at least 5 years. Only a few animals are slaughtered annually at the single location of captive cervids (elk) in Hawaii.  Testing is not mandatory, and has not been conducted for the last several years. Surveillance from hunter killed deer began in 2003.  Five to ten (5-10) black-tailed deer were tested from the 30-50 annually harvested; and 30-40 axis deer from the approx. 350 harvested.  No reports of sick or abNormal deer were detected and new cervids have been introduced into Hawaii, thus testing was discontinued.  Most public hunting areas baiting is prohibited. Most public hunting areas feeding is prohibited. No ban at this time. No No
Idaho Idaho State Department of Agriculture/Animal Industries has jurisdiction over domestic cervidae, which includes elk, fallow deer and reindeer.   Idaho Department of Fish and Game has jurisdiction over importation and possession of all other species of wildlife.      Contact:  Toby Boudreau, Wildlife Bureau Chief, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, toby.boudreau@idfg.idaho.gov No mule deer or white-tailed deer imports allowed by IDFG.  ISDA allows interstate import of reindeer, elk and fallow deer to approved cervidae farms.  Health requirements include: negative brucellosis testing for cervids 6 months and older, must have 2 negative tests within 30 days of import; negative tuberculosis tests and compliance with USDA TB UMR for captive cervids; elk must tbe in a CWD monitoring program for at least 60 months with a CWD herd certification program (HCP) and records of all deaths within last 5 years;   all cervidae originating east of the 100th meridian, except those going directly to slaughter are required to reviece anthelmithic treatment of P. tenuis, within one-hundred and eighty days (180) days prior to import into Idaho. Treatment must be documented on the certificate of veterinary inspection; valid health certificate from state of origin; individual identification number; entry permit. Elk must be in a CWD monitoring program in originating state for at least 60 months with a CWD free herd status and records of all deaths within last 5 years must be provided.  No domestic cervids allowed from areas where CWD is endemic.  All domestic cervidae must originate from a herd that is in good standing and actively participating in the National CWD Herd Certification Program.  No wild cervid importation allowed without CWD information from originating state herds.     In 2018 IDFG completed a new CWD response plan and strategy. The following rules were approved: Idaho does not allow the importation of live wild elk, deer, or moose. Idaho does not allow the use of natural urine from deer, elk, moose, reindeer, and caribou for big game hunting. When hunting outside Idaho, follow the rules of that state for meat handling, carcass transport and other restrictions. Idaho does not allow the importation of a carcass of a wild deer, elk or moose from
another state, province, or other country where CWD has been found. Idaho does allow meat that is cut and wrapped; quarters or deboned meat that does not include brain or spinal tissue; edible organs that do not include brain; hides without heads; upper canine teeth; elk ivories; finished taxidermy; or dried antlers with dried skull cap or dried skull with brain tissue removed.
CWD monitoring has been done on all domestic elk herds through the Idaho Department of Agriculture.  Unless a domestic cervidae ranch is operating under an approved ranch management plan, brain tissue from no less than 10% of all domestic cervidae 16 months of age or older that are harvested on domestic cervidae ranches shall be submitted for CWD testing.  Brain tissue from 100% of all domestic cervidae 16 months of age or older that die for any reason other than harvest shall be submitted for CWD testing.  IDFG pemits less than 6 captive mule and white-tailed deer facilities, all of which are required to report any deaths within 24 hr.  Additional requirements for identification and record keeping are under consideration.  A prohibition on import of wild elk, deer, and moose was approved by the Idaho Leglislature in 2019 (this rule does not pertain to Domestic Elk). General and targeted surveillance has been done on over 18,000 deer and elk taken from hunter kills and road kills since 1997.  A new sampling scheme centered on mule deer and rotating around various ecotype areas on a three year basis.  A point system with a goal of 300 points has been adopted to focus sampling on the statewide populations. Annual sampling is conducted for deer and elk in high risk populations that border CWD positive states. A three-year rotation of lower risk populations is conducted around the rest of the state.  Targeted sruveillance is conducted in areas identified as either high risk or areas where we do not have a great enough sample numbers. All animals that are symptomatic or suspect are tested for CWD.  Idaho does not allow and has never allowed the baiting of cervids. Idaho State Department of Agriculture has rules regarding the feeding of cervids by private individuals in eastern Idaho along the Wyoming border to reduce brucellosis risk. Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) has a commission policy of feeding cervids only on an emergency basis in the winter.  If CWD is found in Idaho, prohibitions on feeding may be imposed and consideration of CWD will be part of decisions to provide emergency winter feeding.   As of 2018, Idaho implemented a rule to not allow the importation of hunter-harvested cervids from known CWD areas. Hunters are cautioned that they should know and comply with regulations in the state in which they will hunt.  Recommendations for disposal of carcasses and carcass remainders in desginated landfills.  If CWD is found in Idaho, a CWD area designation will be made and carcass movement restrictions imposed.  The use of natrual urine scents for cervids is prohibited. No No
Illinois Department of Agriculture processes and administers import applications and oversees captive cervid CWD monitoring program.  Department of Natural Resources administers Captive Game Breeder licensing program.  Both have authority over importation and possession.  Contact: Dan Skinner, 217-782-7580, Daniel.J.Skinner@illinois.gov All elk entering Illinois 6 months and older must originate from a brucellosis-free herd or be negative to a brucellosis card test, standard plate agglutination (SPT) test, or complement fixation (CF) test within 60 days of import, certification of brucellosis free herds shall be established and maintained in accordance with the Brucellosis Uniform Methods and Rules approved by USAHA; All cervids must be in compliance with Illinois Diseased Animals Act, 8 Ill. Adm. Code 85 and Ill Bovidae and Cervidae Tuberculosis Eradication Act; Must be accompanied by a permit  from IDA and a CVI; See specific regulations relating to CWD at right, must have approved unique official identification plus secondary identifier.  For  complete rules, see http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/008/008000850001200R.html CVI must state that cervid does not originate from a CWD endemic area (any county and surrounding counties where CWD has been diagnosed in the past 5 years); must originate from a herd that has been CWD monitored for at least 5 years under a state/federally approved CWD certification program and was CWD free for that period and must meet the following criteria: any additions to herd must be natural or in herd for at least one year, complete records must be maintained for 5 years, animals have not been exposed to any animal from a herd diagnosed with CWD in the past 5 years, herd has been under vet supervision for a minimum of 5 years and has no exposure to any cervid from a CWD trace-back or trace-forward herd, statement must be signed by herd owner stating that all information on CVI is correct.   No Any cervid dying from an unknown cause or that has been euthanized that has exhibited neurological disorder must be tested for CWD; any cervid exhibiting symptoms of CWD will be destroyed and tested or quarantined until it can be determined that the animal does not have CWD.  Two 'voluntary' CWD herd monitoring programs have been established ("Certified Monitored vs. "Contained Monitored") - intrastate movement or sales of cervids will be contingent upon participation in one of the programs.  In April 2018, a captive reindeer in Northern Illinois tested positive for CWD. Over 140,200 wild deer have been tested since 1998, with the first positive found in October 2002.  To date (April 20, 2021) 1,162 positive deer have been identified from 19 counties (Jo Daviess, Boone, Winnebago, McHenry, DeKalb, Ogle, Kane, LaSalle, Stephenson, Du Page, Kendall, Grundy, Lake, Will, Kankakee, Livingston, Carroll, Cook and Lee) in Northern Illinois. 12/27/02: (17 Ill. Adm. Code 635.40):Ban on feeding of wild deer and wildlife in areas where wild deer are present.  Ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks and other food products, with some exceptions such as squirrel and birds feeders close to homes and incidental feeding within livestock facilities. 12/27/02: (17 Ill. Adm. Code 635.40):Ban on feeding of wild deer and wildlife in areas where wild deer are present.  Ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks and other food products, with some exceptions such as squirrel and birds feeders close to homes and incidental feeding within livestock facilities. 12/27/02: (17 Ill. Adm. Code 635.30): prohibits the importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk carcasses into Illinois with the exception of deboned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps, upper canine teeth, and finished taxidermist mounts.  07/25/03: Hunters may bring in deer and/or elk carcasses if they are brought to a licensed meat processor or licensed taxidermist within 72 hours of entering the state. Yes Yes
Indiana Department of Natural Resources and State Board of Animal Health.  Contact: Joe Caudell, Ph.D., State Deer Biologist, jcaudell@dnr.in.gov   and    Mitch Marcus, Fish and Wildlife Health Supervisor, mmarcus@dnr.in.gov.     For IN BOAH farmed cerivds Contact:  Dr. Shelly Chavis; schavis@boah.in.gov; 260-450-2139 or Paula Livers, plivers@boah.in.gov; 317-544-2395 For movement into the state, rules applicable to CWD susceptible species.  For these species, the state of origin must have animal health officials with authority to quarantine for CWD; have state law requiring CWD positives to be reported to animal health official; engage in surveillance for CWD in captive and free-ranging populations; must not have had CWD diagnosed in any cervid within the last 5 years; and must be a USDA "Approved" state.  The herd of origin must be a CWD certified herd and no animal in, from or traced to the herd may have been diagnosed with CWD within the last 5 years. CVI and permit from state veterinarian required to move live animal.  Other health requirements including  tuberculosis and brucellosis testing may be required  for some movements. After meeting state of origin and herd of origin requirments (see standard regulations), the individual animal can not have origniated from a state with CWD in the captive or wild cervids less than five years prior to the request for importation.  Also, cervids must come from a herd that contains no animals moved within the last 60 months from a farm currently under quarantine for CWD positive or exposed animals.   CWD Response Plan has been reviewed and updated by INBOAH and INDNR 2019.  Indiana has "Approved" status in the federal CWD Herd Certification Program.  Producers with CWD susceptible species must join the CWD Registered Program or the CWD Certification Program.  Non-CWD susceptible species may join either program voluntarily.  The CWD Certification Program requires identification, record-keeping, and sampling of all deads over one year of age.  Cervids in the Certification Progarm gain status required for interstate movement.   From 2002 through 2017, approximately 20,000 deer were tested throughout the state and no positives were found.  From 2017-2020, testing was concentrated in Northeast and Nortwest Indiana to monitor for positive deer that may move from CWD endemic areas in Michigan and Illinois, respectively.  Approximatly 1,000 deer were tested in these areas each year with no CWD detected.   Testing will continue for additional hunter harvested samples and deer exhibiting clinical signs of CWD statewide.  More information on CWD testing can be found at on.in.gov/CWD.  Testing results can be found in the annual deer report located at deer.dnr.in.gov. Baiting banned.  Up to $500 fine and 60 days in jail for violation. No ban at this time. Fall 2005 : Importation of carcasses and parts from CWD-susceptible species is restricted to one of the following: (1) Carcasses without the head, spinal cord, and small intestine attached. (2) Carcasses with the head, spinal cord or small intestine attached may enter the state if they are delivered directly to a licensed meat processor, a registered deer processor, or a licensed taxidermist. Businesses accepting these carcasses must dispose of offal via landfill, commercial incinerator, or rendering. (3) Clean antlers, hides, teeth, and finished taxidermist mounts may enter without restrictions. No No
Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship.  Contact: Jeff Kaisand, DVM - State Veterinarian Jeff.Kaisand@iowaagriculture.gov                                       515-281-0866 or Dee Clausen - 515-281-8236     Permanent official identification number. Captive cervids native to or originating from any county or region under quarantine for TB not eligible for import. All Cervidae 6 months and older must test negative for Brucellosis within 90 days of importation or originate from a certified brucellosis-free herd. Cervidae less than 6 months must originate from a herd which has tested negative for brucellosis within the past 12 months or from a certified brucellosis-free herd. All Cervidae 6 months and older must test negative for TB utilizing the single cervical test within 90 days of importation, or originate from a TB accredited herd or from a TB qualified herd which has been tested within 90 days of import. Test dates must be included on the certificate of veterinary inspection. Herd status and testing protocols are according to the USDA TB Eradication in Cervidae Uniform Methods and Rules. Cervidae less than 6 months imported into the state must originate from a herd which has been whole-herd tested TB negative within the past 12 months or originate from a TB accredited herd.  Administrative Rules Modifying Importation Requirements of Cervidae, 1/26/05: No cervid originating from or having been located within a 30 mile radius area endemic for CWD allowed, No cervid from herd having animal introductions from area considered endemic to CWD during last 5 years, all require entry permit issued by the state veterinarian,  CVI must state no diagnosis, signs, or epidemiological evidence of CWD in originating herd for year previous to import.  All cervids in originating herd must have been there for at least 1 year or have been natural addition, herd must have no evidence or diagnosis of CWD, cervid must originate from certified or monitored CWD herd, with the CWD herd no., anniversary date, expiration date and herd status for each animal listed on the CVI. All CWD susceptible cervidae shall only be allowed from herds which are enrolled in and satisfactorily completed at least five years in an official recognized CWD monitoring program.   To meet the new Federal rules requirements, Iowa rules effective November 1, 2012, will require CWD testing of all Iowa captive CWD suseceptible cervid mortalities or slaughtered animals that are 12 months of age  and older in CWD Program enrolled herds.   Voluntary surveillance for elk and deer, but no purchase or movement is allowed from herds not enrolled in a program. Have tested over 88,000 wild white-tailed deer since surveillance began in 2002.  First positive in the wild was found from surveillance in 2013/14 deer season in NE Iowa. As of Dec. 2019, hunters can also submit samples for CWD testing through the Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at Iowa State University independent of Iowa DNR surveillance activities. Baiting prohibited. No ban. Ban on the importation of a whole carcass from any cervid taken from a CWD endemic area within any state or province, may only transport boned-out meat, capes, and antlers attached to clean skull plates from which the brain tissue has been removed. No intra-state carcass movement restrictions. Yes - 320 captive deer and 2 elk from 7 Premises (2 hunting Preserves and 5 Farm Deer herds), All premises have been depopulated.  Yes - 112 free-ranging white-tailed deer; 61 in Allamakee Co., 1 in Appanoose, 20 in Clayton Co., 1 in Decatur Co., 2 in Dubuque Co. (roadkill 2018, hunter-harvest 2020), 2 in Fayette Co., 1 in Jackson Co., 1 in Lee (found during captive cervid depopulation 2020), 15 in Wayne Co., 6 in Winneshiek Co., 2 in Woodbury Co. (roadkill 2019, hunter-harvest 2020)"
 
Kansas* Kansas Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health (KDAH) has jurisdiction over captive cervids.  Contact Dr. Paul Grosdidier, paul.grosdidier@ks.gov, 785-564-6601.  Or Visit our web page at www.agriculture.ks.gov/animalhealth All cervids regardless of age changing ownership, alive or dead within Kansas must have an official identification, and be accompanied by Domesticated Deer Movement Notification form or CVI.  Live deer moving for change of ownership in Kansas or moving into Kansas must have 2 forms of identification, with at least 1 being an official identification.  Brucellosis - For interstate and intrastate movement, cervids, except whitetail deer, mule deer, fallow deer and axis deer,  12 months of age or older must have a negative brucellosis within 30 days of movement or originate and move directly from a Brucellosis certified free herd.   Tuberculosis - For intrastate movement must have a negative TB test within 90 days, or have originated and moved directly from a TB accredited free herd.  Interstate movement must originate and move directly from a TB accredit free herd.  Herd Certification or Accreditation numbers and last date of test must be included on the CVI.  All CVIs must have a permit number issued by the KDAH office prior to entry. Must have permit from KDAH prior to movement into Kansas.  Farm of destination in Kansas must have a valid domestic cervidae license or must move directly to a registered slaughter facility within Kansas.  Movement to a preserve for hunting purposes does noT apply as being moved direct to slaughter. Imports are restricted to those which have at least 5 years of CWD surveillance under a state program compliant with the federal HCP program.  Two forms of identification with at least one form being an official identification must be individually listed on the CVI. Kansas is a compliant state under the Federal HCP program.  All participants in the Kansas CWD program are required to have all animals over 1 year of age officially identified, and 100% sampling for any farm mortalities or animals sent to slaughter.  Exceptions to this may only be made by the Animal Health Commissioner in the event of mass mortalities due to a disease event (such as EHD) where a diagnosis has been confirmed at an accredited laboratory, or a natural disaster in which a large number of animals are killed.  All owners of whitetail and mule deer, moose, red deer or north American elk are required to have fences a minimum of 8 feet in height, and all fences must be maintained in such a way as to prevent escape into the wild or ingress of wild cervids into the captive herd.  Records of all animals that were born or have moved into or out a herd must be recorded.  A yearly herd inventory and reconciliation is to be conducted, with a visual verification of official identification being conducted at least every 3 years in all herds in the CWD program.   Participants in the CWD program may only receive animals from herds with an equal or higher CWD status or will drop to level of the animal with the lowest CWD status in the herd. Participation in the CWD program is voluntary.  All CWD testing is conducted at the owners expense.  Samples may be collected by the owner's or by individuals trained in sampling for CWD.  Sample collections are to include both the obex and 1 medial retropharyngeal lymph node, and all animal identification is to be listed on the submission form. Have performed surveillance since 1997. No No No ban at this time. Yes-one animal found as part of trace from an infected  Colorado herd in 1997.   The entire herd was depopulated and never restocked. Yes, white-tailed deer January 2006.  Have seen almost yearly since that time.
Kentucky Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources (KDFWR) regulates the physical facilities for captive cervids. Kentucky Dept. of Agriculture (KDA) is in charge of the health certification of captive cervids, including the Cervid Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Identification (CCWDSI) program, & all transportation permits (importation and intrastate movement). Both agencies require ear tags.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Contact:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               (KDFWR) kyle.sams@ky.gov  502-892-4523;  (KDA); statevet@ky.gov 502-573-0282 or (KDA) christopher.hinkle@ky.gov 502-782-5922 Dept. of Ag. requires a CVI, import permit, and an Official RFID tag to be eligible for importation.  Importation of cervids reviewed and approved on a case-by-case basis.  Must originate from a CWD certified herd.  Cervid must come from a Tuberculosis Accredited herd or be negative to an offical Tuberculosis test within 90 days of entry. Prohibition on importation of live cervids from CWD positive states.  Intrastate movement requires a transportation permit, CVI, and valid KDA and KDFWR captive cervid permits. Cervids may not be moved into a new facility until all wild deer are removed and a valid captive cervid permit has been obtained from both KDFWR and KDA. Yes; KDA is revising captive cerivd regulations to streamline processing and to ensure disease testing.  New regulations, requires certification for individuals collecting CWD samples, educational training requirement for current certified herd owners and at time of initial enrollment, and enhancement to the identification requirement to include mandatory RFID of all cervids enrolled in herds.  A CWD Response Plan for wild cervids has been developed by KDFWR and adopted by KDA. In response to a CWD+ detection near Kentucky's border, regulations will be revised to help prevent the spread of CWD into Kentucky. All cervid facilities, except non-commercial facilities, must be enrolled with KDA's Cervid CWD Surveillance Identification Program and be enrolled in one of two monitoring programs. The Herd Certificiation Program (HCP) requires the CWD testing of all cervids ≥ 12 months of age that die, or any cervid displaying clinical signs of CWD within 7 days of the animals death. The Herd Monitoring Program (HMP) requires the testing of all cervids that are ≥12 months of age that die for any reason or any cervid displaying clinical signs of CWD.  Samples for Herd Monitored Programs are required to be submitted within 30 days of the animals harvest or death. Approximately 35,300 samples have been tested through hunter-harvested and targeted surveillance of free-ranging cervids since 2002. All samples tested have not detected CWD. Targeted survillance is ongoing and increasing. Beginning in 2012, the state surveillance program began 100% targeted surveillance, which reduced the number of samples tested, but increase the likelihood of each sample to detect CWD, if present.  Baiting is allowed on private land (over 95% of Kentucky land). Baiting is prohibited on all state-managed WMAs and on federally owned areas.  Sept. 2021: Prohibition on baiting and feeding of all wildlife by means of any grain, salt, mineral or other attractants intended to be ingested within the surveillance zone, except for: Normal agricultural practices, including food plots; Hanging bird feeders within the curtilage of the home; and Furbearer trapping (trappers shall use no grain, salt or mineral). Cannot feed wildlife outside the curtilage of the home from March 1 - May 31. Sept. 2021: Prohibition on baiting and feeding of all wildlife by means of any grain, salt, mineral or other attractants intended to be ingested within the surveillance zone, except for: Normal agricultural practices, including food plots; Hanging bird feeders within the curtilage of the home; and Furbearer trapping (trappers shall use no grain, salt or mineral). By regulation: Ban on importation of brain and spinal column of hunter harvested carcasses from all states and other countries.  Hunters may import boned out meat, quarters and meat portions without spinal column or head attached, antlers, antlers attached to clean skull plate, clean skull, clean upper canines, hide, and finished taxidermy mounts.  Sept. 2021: In response to a CWD+ within 30 miles of the Kentucky border, prohibition on transport of entire cervid carcasses, skull contents or spinal columns from deer harvested or slaughtered in the surveillance zone (excluding antlers, antlers attached to a clean skull plate, a clean skull, clean teeth, finished taxidermy work, hide or deboned meat)s. No No
Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry regulates cervids kept for commercial purposes. LA Dept of AG Animal Health (225) 925-3980.  Department of Wildlife & Fisheries regulates white-tailed deer kept for non-commercial purposes.  Contact: James M. LaCour DVM State Wildlife Veterinarian, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries  (225) 765-0823  jmlacour@wlf.la.gov 05/06/02: Wildlife & Fisheries Commission Declaration of Emergency: Banned importation of deer and elk into state, also restricted movements within state. State law now prohibits importation of live cervids with the exception of legally imported captive cervids. Currently, LA Dept of Ag has a moratorium in place banning the importation of white-tailed deer, mule deer, reindeer, moose, and elk.  Ck with LA Dept of AG for specs.  (225) 925-3980.  05/06/02: Ban importation of deer and elk into state.   Have placed a moratorium on the issuance of new game breeder licenses (LDWF).  LA Dept of AG currently has a moratorium in place banning the importation of white-tailed deer, mule deer, reindeer, moose, and elk.  Ck with LA Dept of AG for specs.  (225) 925-3980. Yes, LDAF has re-written its laws governing captive cervids including some CWD information.  LDWF has instituted carcass importation restrictions. State law passed banning importation of cervids into LA with the exception of LDAF permitted cervids.  LDAF moratorium on importation still in place at this time. LA Dept. of AG has developed regulations requiring any permitted game farm enrolled in their CWD Certification Program to submit samples from any animal that dies for any reason.  Pens not enrolled in the CWD Certification Program are not required to test. To date just over 12,000 samples from wild white-tailed deer have been tested by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.  No CWD has been detected..  LDWF tests only target animals: 1) road killed deer, 2) emaciated deer, 3) neurological deer, 4) exotic cervid species and 5) deer harvested adjacent to LA Dept. of AG -licensed import pens.  Also, deer in parishes adjacent to MS index CWD case. No. No. Cervid carcass importation restrictions in place as of March 1, 2017.  Allow only importation of deboned meat or quartered meat with spinal column and head removed.  Antlers, cleaned skull plates, cleaned elk ivory, capes and finished taxidermy mounts may enter LA.  No intact/ non-taxidermied heads allowed.   Use or possession of natural deer urine or natural deer tissue lures prohibited unless the product carries the ATA Deer Protection Program/ Responsible Hunting Scent Association seal and states that it has been tested using the RT-QuIC test and CWD prions were not detected. No No
Maine* Department of Agriculture regulates cervids used for commercial purposes, Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife regulates all other imports.  Contact: Kyle Ravana, MDIFW, 207-941-4472 kyle.r.ravana@maine.gov To prevent the introduction of CWD into Maine and pursuant to 12 MRSA Part 12, Chapter 903, Subchapter 2 §10103, 2 & §10104.1, it is now illegal for hunters who travel to any other states & provinces (except for NH and the provinces of QC, NB and Newfoundland/Labrador) to hunt deer, elk, moose or caribou to transport any carcass parts that pose a risk of containing CWD prions. Hunters may return to Maine only with boned-out meat, hardened antlers (with or without skull caps), hides without the head, & finished taxidermy mounts. If still attached, skull caps should be cleaned free of brain and other tissues. It is legal for individuals to transport through the State of Maine cervid carcasses  or parts destined for other states, provinces or countries. Such transportation is to occurr without undue delay & using the most reasonably direct route through Maine to the final destination for the cervid carcass or parts & in a manner that is both leak-proof & that prevents their exposure to the environment. The Maine Department of Agriculture has banned imports of live cervids from other states until a fail-safe importation system can be implemented. NA Captive/farmed deer are monitored for the presence of CWD using on-farm health monitoring practices, and by testing certain farmed deer for CWD at slaughter. Captive/farmed cervids are currently sampled for CWD testing at two USDA inspected slaughter facilities.  Over 1,000 slaughtered farm raised cervids since 2001. Approximately 500-600 hunter-killed deer are tested annually for CWD.  Sampling is focused in towns containing active cervid farms, and/or winter feeding operations.   Deer baiting is illegal  No ban at this time.  We are encouraging people to voluntarily phase out feeding as a disease prevention measure. Deer that are not harvested from a state or province adjacent to Maine are not allowed to be brought into Maine unless they meet the following: boned out meat, hardened antlers, skull caps cleaned of all tissues, capes and hides with no skull, teeth, and finished taxidermy mounts. Using outreach to discourage hunters from importing high-risk tissues from out-of-state hunts.  Hunters also cautioned to use urine-based lures above the reach of deer and to handle them with caution. No No
Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Department of Agriculture.  Contact: Karina Stonesifer, DNR, (301-777-2136, karina.stonesifer@maryland.gov No imports allowed except Accredited American Zoological Association facilities.  No cervid farming.  Captive owners must sterilize all their cervids or separate sexes to prevent reproduction (currently, approximately 100 animals). Exception - we now permit limited reproduction by fallow deer only, up to, but not exceeding, the number of fallow deer they are permitted to currently possess. Possession of cervids not permitted except for approximately 6 individuals grandfathered in. Due to positive deer discovered outside of the CWD Management Area the CWD Response Plan is activated and the CWD Management Area has been enlarged to cover all of Allegany County and all of Washington County.  Additional details can be found on the department's website. No live animal testing planned; captive cervid owners required to submit dead animals for CWD testing. As of 10/1/2021 - 10,882 deer tested for CWD with 80 positive animals confirmed. Targeted surveillance has been conducted since 1999.  Active surveillance statewide using hunter-harvested deer conducted 2002 - 2009.  2010 - 2015 active surveillance was conducted in Allegany County.  Active surveillance is currently being conducted within all of Allegany, Frederick, Garrett, Montgomery & Washington Counties. Baiting is permitted statewide, except on state-owned or managed properties. Feeding is permitted statewide, except on state-owned or managed properties. Carcasses from areas where CWD has been reported must be processed prior to entering the state unless the final destination is within Maryland's CWDMA or with a CWD authorized processor or taxidermist.    Cleaned skulls, hides, antlers, finished taxidermy mounts, boneless meat permitted. Recent regulations limit transport of animal parts from the MD counties where CWD has been found. Travelers may pass through the entire state with whole carcasses if the carcasses will not remain in the state for more than 24 hours and no parts are disposed of or remain in Maryland.  No Yes
Massachusetts* Division of Fisheries and Wildlife regulates importation and possession, the F&W Board creates and modifies regulations and policies regarding captive cervid imports.  Contact: David Stainbrook, david.stainbrook@state.ma.us, 508-389-6320. Regulation prohibiting the importation of all live cervids.  Previous regulations: No white-tailed deer or elk imports allowed, only farmed deer allowed are fallow, sika, and red deer. Regulation prohibiting the importation of all live cervids.  Previous regulations: No white-tailed deer or elk imports allowed, only farmed deer allowed are fallow, sika, and red deer. NA - Implemented. Mandatory testing of all captive cervid mortalities, provided funding is available. Random testing of hunter-harvested deer and vehicle-killed moose and deer from 2002-2011 (4530 samples from white-tailed deer and 26 from moose to date with no positives). Federal funding ceased in 2012, thus sampling is limited to clinical suspect deer and moose. Baiting is prohibited (during and 10 days prior to the deer hunting season). No ban on feeding (when not related to hunting) at this time. 08/1/05: Emergency regulation restricting the importation of cervid carcass parts from states diagnosed with CWD in either captive or wild herds. Regulation became permanent 9/2005.   Exceptions to the restriction include: boned out meat, hides without heads attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull or skull plates with antlers attached, clean upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories), and finished taxidermy heads. No No
Michigan Executive order no. 2004-3, 4/15/04, transferred responsibility for regulations and biosecurity of captive cervid facilities from Department of Agriculture & Rural Development to Department of Natural Resources.   A complete audit of the industry was conducted by MDNR summer and early fall of 2004.  MDARD will oversee disease testing of captive cervids. MDNR oversees facility permits.  MDNR: Vacant, 517-336-5030, MDARD: Nora Wineland, 800-292-3939, WinelandN@michigan.gov Importation of cervids reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Import requirements revised in 2014. Must originate from a CWD certified and TB accredited herd. Must be imported into CWD Certified herd and current herd owner must have participated in Herd Certification Program for at least 3 years. Exporting herd must not be within 25 miles of a CWD positive in a POC in past 5 years, 75 miles from a CWD positive in a free ranging  within past 10 years if single fence, or in 50 miles from a CWD positive in a free ranging  within past 10 years if double fence. Fence requirements from exporting herds must meet MI POC standards (10'). Currently ban imports from Wisconsin, Colorado, and Wyoming. Exporting herd must not have imported animals from WI, CO, or WY in last 5 years. Individual animal to be imported will be traced to all herds resided in since birth. Importation of cervids reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Imported animal must stay in herd for 2 years and then may only be moved to a new facility by permit. Imported animals meeting above criteria may only move to CWD certified herds. Imported animals may be moved to a ranch facility after 5 years and must be moved by permit. No regulations related to CWD management are being considered at this time. CWD Surveillance Program; all death losses due to illness in privately owned cervid (POC) herds over 12 months of age, and 25% of hunted/culled must be reported to Department of Agriculture & Rural Development and submitted for CWD testing.  CWD is a reportable disease and if suspected, must be reported to MDARD immediately. Herd Certification Program (as of 2020 all full facilities are required to participate): must test all death losses greater than 12 months of age. As of 09/30/2021, have tested over 117,000 white-tailed deer, more than 1,600 elk, and 79 moose. The first positive free-ranging white-tailed deer was found in May 2015.  CWD has been identified in 9 counties (Clinton, Dickinson, Eaton, Gratiot, Ingham, Ionia, Jackson, Kent, and Montcalm). Active surveillance will continue in 2021 in select regions. Targeted surveillance will continue in the remainder of the state for deer, elk, and moose.  Effective January 31, 2019, baiting is banned throughout the entire Lower Peninsula of Michigan and in the Upper Peninsula CWD Core Surveillance Area, with the exception of allowance for hunters with disabilities for 6 days during the season.  Baiting is legal in the rest of the state (Upper Peninsula) from Sept. 15 - Jan 1 and cannot exceed 2 gallons. Must be dispersed over a minimum of a 10 x 10 ft area. Effective January 31, 2019, recreational  feeding is banned throughout the entire Lower Peninsula of Michigan and in the Upper Peninsula CWD Core Surveillance Area.   In the rest of the state (Upper Peninsula) feed must be placed not more than 100 yards from a residence and not exceed 2 gallons per calendar day. Supplemental feeding is prohibited in Michigan, except in the Upper Peninsula. Supplemental feeding may not begin prior to January 1 and must end by May 15. Feed must be placed at least 1 mile from livestock, farmed fields, and orchards. Feed must consist solely of grains and pelletized food materials containing no animal protein and can not exceed a depth of 3 inches.  Neither recreational or supplemental feeding may take place if the location is deemed a hazard (e.g. high risk of traffic collisions). Effective 10/17/17: Prohibit importation of any carcass of free-ranging deer, elk, or moose into Michigan from anywhere outside of the state's borders. Deboned meat, quarters or parts that do not have spinal column or head attached, antlers, antlers attached to a skull cap cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue, hides cleaned of excess tissue or blood, upper canine teeth, finished taxidermy mount, and tissue imported for use by a diagnostic or research laboratory are all allowed to be imported into Michigan. Any person bringing full carcasses or parts other than those listed above is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 90 days or a fine of not less than $500 or more than $2,000, or both, and the cost of prosecution.                                                                        

Effective 7/16/20:  A harvested deer cannot be possessed or transported outside of Montcalm County, Otisco, Orleans, Ronald, and north Plains Townships in Ionia County, and Nelson, Spencer, Courtland, Oakfield, Grattan, and Cannon Townships in Kent County unless it is deboned meat, quarters or other parts of a cervid that do not have any part of the spinal column or head attached, antlers, antlers attached to a skull cap cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue, hides, upper canine teeth, or a finished taxidermist mount, OR the hunter has presented the head at a designated drop off location within 24 hours after killing the deer.
Statewide restrictions also apply for natural urine based lures and attractants.  Only urine produced by facilities enrolled in a Federal Herd Certification Program is eligible to be used in Michigan.
Yes. One facility in Kent County, 2008; Two facilties in Mecosta County, 2017; one facility in Montcalm County, 2019; one facility in Newaygo County, 2020; one facility each in Montcalm and Mecosta counties, 2021. Yes. The first white-tailed deer was detected in 2015. As of 09/30/2021 the number of CWD positive WTD stands at 213.
Minnesota MN Board of Animal Health regulates all captive deer, elk, and other cervids. Contact: Dr. Linda Glaser, linda.glaser@state.mn.us Farmed cervid imports must have official ID and ID written on CVI.  No brucellosis test required.  Animal must be from TB accredited herd or herd with negative whole herd test in last year and test on individual animal within 90 days prior to movement.  Captive cervids can only be possessed in herds registered with the MN Board of Animal Health. CWD surveillance is mandatory for captive cervids that die.  Additionally, laws regulate fencing, escapes, animal transfers, importation, animal identification, and herd inventories. There have been 12 captive cervid farms detected with CWD in MN since 2002. Animals may not be imported from a CWD endemic area (defined as counties where CWD infected wild cervids are found).  Imported animals must be from a herd with CWD Status level 6. CWD was confirmed in two captive faciliites, one during the fall of 2020 (within the already established Southeast CWD management zone) and spring 2021 in a new area. Following the response plan this will lead to one additional CWD suveillance zone in and around Beltrami County. Recreational deer feeding bans will be expanded to include Beltrami County and adjacent counites. Mandatory testing for all captive cervids. Over 95,000 hunter-harvested CWD samples have been collected statewide since 2002. In accordance to the CWD response plan, surveillance is conducted based on risk. The main source of sample collection is through sampling of hunter-harvested deer within our CWD management, control, and surveillance zones. Samples are also collected through taxidermist programs in areas where risk is present. For all management and control zones there are carcass movement restrictions in place for hunters to follow, unless they have a not detected test result for their deer. Targeted culling efforts directed through the agency occur from January to April with focused areas wtihin 2-3 miles of known positive deer. Opportunistic samples are collected statewide from cervids reported to be exhibiting clinical symptoms of CWD. Since 2011, CWD has been confirmed in 115 free-ranging white-tailed deer. No baiting allowed. MN DNR obtained legal authority in 2003 to ban feeding of deer to control CWD.  Currently there are 32 counties that have a feeding ban in place. Of those 32. 24 counties that surround the CWD management zones have an additional ban on the use of attractants. The remaining 8 counties surrounding CWD positive deer farms impose a ban on feeding only. Importation of whole cervid carcasses into the state from anywhere outside of Minnesota's borders is banned. Only the following portions of hunter-harvested cervidae carcasses may be brought into the state: cut and wrapped meat; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; antlers, hides, or teeth; finished taxidermy mounts; and antlers attached to skull caps that are cleaned of all brain tissue. Within a CWD management or control zones, whole carcass can not leave the zone until a not detected test result is reported. Only the following items can leave the CWD management or control zones prior to a test result: cut and wrapped meat; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; antlers, hides, or teeth; finished taxidermy mounts; and antlers attached to skull caps that are cleaned of all brain tissue. Yes Yes
Mississippi Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries & Parks (MDWFP) has jurisdiction over white-tailed deer.  Contact Lt. Trent Myers.  601-432-2400.  The Mississippi  Board of Animal Health has jurisdiction over exotics.  Contact number 601-359-1170 .  MDWFP has plenary power to regulate all commercial and noncommercial wild animal enclosures.-- http://www.mdwfp.com/media/256096/w-rule-82-regulations-for-white-tailed-deer-enclosures-final.pdf Temporary moratorium on importation of elk, red deer, mule deer, black-tailed deer and other cervids designated as susceptible to chronic wasting disease; White-tailed deer importation prohibited; If chronic wasting disease is diagnosed within a high-fenced enclosure, the owner shall work with the commission to determine a solution for containing the disease within the enclosure; however, the commission shall not declare surrounding or adjoining properties within a five (5) mile radius of the enclosure a CWD Management Zone, until chronic wasting disease is positively detected within such radius on these surrounding or adjoining properties. If chronic wasting disease is diagnosed within five (5) miles of the enclosure, the owner of such enclosure shall allow department personnel to enter the enclosure to utilize the best collection methods possible to obtain tissue samples for testing. All high-fenced enclosures must submit a minimum of 1 viable CWD sample per 200 high-fenced acres. None at this time. All high fenced enclosures that contain white-tailed deer must submit 1 viable sample per 200 acres.   Mississippi began testing for CWD in 2002.  A total of 35,868 samples have been collected since 2002.  CWD was discovered in February 2018.  23,281 of the total samples were collected since discovery.  Mississippi currently has detected 83 positives in 8 counties.  Sampling in 2020-2021 season included three mandatory sample weekends, 46 voluntary CWD drop-off freezers, taxidermists, road-kill, and target deer.  Feeding and mineral sites are banned in CWD Management Zones.  In the remainder of Mississippi, feed may be provided from above-ground, covered feeders or from stationary spin cast feeders.  Hunting is allowed over these feeders. Feeding and mineral sites are banned in CWD Management Zones.  In the remainder of Mississippi, feed may be provided from above-ground, covered feeders or from stationary spin cast feeders.  Yes.  Only cut/wrapped meat, deboned meat, quartered meat with no spinal column attached, hides with no head attached, finished taxidermy, antlers with no tissue attached, and cleaned skulls/skull plates may be brought into Mississippi from any state or country.  These same list applies within state in regards to transporting a deer, or part thereof, to outside a CWD Management Zone.          Within state only: Deer heads may be transported out of a CWD Management Zone to a permitted taxidermist participating in the CWD sample collection program. No Yes.  83 positives in 8 counties. 
Missouri* The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) oversees the permitting of captive cervid facilities raising white-tailed deer and big game hunting preserves. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) oversees the USDA Herd Certification program in Missouri.  Elk raised for human consumption are regulated by MDA. Contact for MDC: Dr. Sherri Russell, State Wildlife Veterinarian, Sherri.Russell@mdc.mo.gov, 573-522-4115 x3617.  Contact Person for MDA: Dr. Sarah Reinkemeyer, State  Epidemiologist, Sarah.Reinkemeyer@mda.mo.gov, 573-751-2251. In addition to standard regulations, see the CWD regulations for captive cervids and wildlife.   Importation of live white-tailed deer, mule deer, and their hybrids prohibited; fencing standards, including single 8' fence with specifications for construction; mandatory CWD testing in all mortalities over six months of age; record keeping requirements (5 year retention of all purchases and sales); 5-year prohibition on the construction of new captive cervid facilities within 25 miles of any confirmed CWD-positive deer;  holding of white-tailed deer, mule-deer and their hybrids in temporary exhibit facilities banned.    New captive cervid regulations have been designed in partnership with the Missouri Department of Agriculture, Industry representation and the Missouri Department of Conservation and are moving through the approval process (tentatively effective in August, 2021).  These regulations will both improve surveillance and reduce financial burden.  "All wildlife breeders and must meet minimum testing requirements . Additionally, MDC regulations require CWD testing for all mortalities over the age of 12-months. Big Game Hunt Preserves must test 50% of harvested males. There are minimum testing requirements for all permitted facilities.  Since 2001, over 152,300 free-ranging deer have been tested for CWD in Missouri. Surveillance focuses on mandatory sampling of hunter-harvested deer opening weekend of firearms season in CWD Management Zone counties, sampling of hunter-harvested male deer by taxidermists throughout the state, targeted sampling of sick deer statewide, and testing of deer culled post-season for disease management in areas with CWD. Hunting deer, turkey and waterfowl over bait has been prohibited for many years in Missouri. Grain, salt products, minerals and other consumable natural or manufactured products used to attract deer are prohibited in "CWD Management Zone" counties (counties within 10-miles of CWD detections, 33 counties for fall 2021). Current regulations prohibit the importation of whole cervid carcasses or carcass parts with the spinal column or head attached with the exception of heads delivered to taxidermists within 48 hours of entry to the state. Additionally, high-risk parts from deer harvested within CWD Management Zone counties in Missouri may not be transported out of the county of harvest with the exception of  parts delivered to a meat processor or taxidermist within 48 hour of exiting the county and heads being transported to Department-approved CWD sampling sites.  In 2010 and 2011 CWD-positive captive white-tailed deer were detected at two (2) big game hunting preserves in Northcentral Missouri (in Linn and Macon counties). In total, eleven (11) CWD-positive deer were removed from these facilities.  Two CWD-positive free-ranging deer were first detected in the state in 2012 (in Macon County). As of April 2021, a total of 206 free-ranging white-tailed deer in 18 counties have been detected in Missouri.  
Montana* Fish, Wildlife & Parks has jurisdiction over licensing, reports, record keeping, exterior fencing, classification, unlawful capture, inspection, and enforcement of those activities.  Department of Livestock has authority over marking, inspection, transport, importation, quarantine, hold orders, interior facilities, health, and enforcement of those activities.  Contact: Wildlife - Jennifer Ramsey JRamsey@mt.gov; Captive - Phil Kilbreath pkilbreath@mt.gov Certificate of veterinary inspection and prior import permit required.  Must be importing to alternative livestock ranch licensed to receive that species; official ID tag; trace back capabilities; No red, axis, rusa, sambar, sika or roe deer imports; white-tailed deer must originate west of the 100th meridian and be certified free of meningeal worm parasites and dorsal spine larvae; elk must be free of red deer genes; cervidae must be TB and Brucellosis tested and certified Para TB free.  Anthelmintic treatment required.  Import fee charged to Montana importer.  Not licensing new captive facilities; licensee may not charge a fee or remuneration for shooting of captive animals; No transfer of existing licenses allowed. No wild or captive imports from geographic area where CWD is endemic or has been diagnosed.  Cervid must originate from a herd that has participated in an approved CWD surveillance program for at least 60 months prior to import; No cervidae have been added to exporting herd within last 60 months from a herd of lesser CWD status; if exporting state has any confirmed CWD, must have completed an epidemiological investigation and identified all CWD affected, exposed, or trace herds.     The 2017 CWD Surveillance and Response Plan was approved and adopted by the Fish and Wildlife commission in April 2018. The plan is a three-part action-specific plan for CWD surveillance, a  response upon detection of CWD, and a communication plan. Senate Bill 173 went into effect on January 1, 2018, prohibiting use of deer or elk urine to mask human odor if the urine originated in a state or province with documented occurances of CWD. CWD response plan has been revised based upon our experiences with CWD, and has been presented to our commission. notable proposed changes include a move away from area specific transport restriction zones within the state to a carcass disposal rule, and also a proposal to prohibit or ban glandular scents. Game Farm Regulation 32.4.1301, Sub-Chapter 13: Requires annual whole herd inspection, ID verification and inventory, must report all animal deaths within 1 working day of discovery and request inspection with CWD samples submitted for testing; test eligible age is 16 months and older; have tested approximately 5,400 animals. Have done state wide sampling since 1998.  From 2011-2016 surveillance was limited due to lack of funding. The first year of  surveillance  from the Surveillance and Response Plan was initiated in fall 2017.  The plan calls for continued testing of symptomatic animals accross the state, plus a weighted surveillance strategy focused primarily on hunter harvested mule deer, and will rotate annually to priority surviellance areas.  Check stations are set up in priority surveillance areas with staff present to collect and submit samples for testing.  Adult road-killed animals are also collected for testing within surveillance areas. In addition, testing is provided free of charge for any hunter accross the state who harvested an animal outside our priority surveillance areas.  Hunters can collect their own samples and send them in, or can go to any regional office to get assistance with sample collection. No baiting allowed. Feeding of game animals is prohibited.  Legislation passed in 2009 providing for increased penalties for feeding of ungulates. In February of 2006, the Montana FWP Commission passed a prohibition on the importation of heads and spinal cords from deer, elk, and moose harvested in states or provinces that have experienced CWD in their wildlife populations or in captive cervid populations in those states or provinces.  Transport of processed meat, deboned meat, quarters, hides, antlers and/or skull caps without any nervous tissue attached, finished taxidermy heads, and ivories are not affected by the prohibition.  The 65th Legislature passed Senate Bill 187 in April of 2017 which took the language from the Commission Rule and codified it into state statute.  The satute took effect January 1, 2018.  Upon detection of CWD in Montana, an initial resonse area (IRA) was designated around each detection.  Special CWD hunts occurred within those IRA.  Transport restriction zones were also designated around each IRA to prevent transportation of infectious materials to other parts of the state. Parts that were allowed out of the TRZ included: meat that is cut and wrapped or meat that has been separated from the bone, quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached,hides with no heads attached, skull plates or antlers with no meat or tissue attached, skulls that have been boiled and cleaned to remove flesh and tissue.  We found the TRZ within the state to be confusing and difficult to enforce, and are currently proposing to move away from area specific transport restrictions within the state to a carcass disposal rule. Yes, in January 2020, Montana Dept of Livestock announced a single CWD positive elk in a small captiver herd in eastern Montana. The herd was HCP compliant. Historically, one captive elk herd was diagnosed as CWD positive in 1998.  That herd of eighty-seven elk was depopulated with 9 animals diagnosed as CWD positive.  A trace forward herd consisting of 29 elk was also depopulated with no CWD positive animals detected. Yes. 
Nebraska Department of Agriculture.  Contact: Dr. Dennis Hughes, State Veterinarian, Nebraska Dept. of Agriculture, dennis.hughes@nebraska.gov Transport prohibited if exposed, infected, or suspected to have an infectious, contagious or transmissible disease; identification number required; cannot be moved through more than one concentration point in 90 days.  Cervids cannot be moved out of endemic counties into non-endemic counties or out of state. CVI for elk or mule deer must verify: 1) the herd of origin has had no diagnosis or epidemiological evidence of CWD for the past 5 years; or 2) The herd has been enrolled 5 or more years in a state approved CWD herd monitoring program and current status has been recorded on CVI. NA All captive cervids 16 months or older that die from illness, slaughter, hunting or any other cause shall be reported within 24 hours and submitted for CWD testing. Since 1997 have checked over 55,000 hunter-harvested/sick deer and over 600 hunter-harvested/sick elk.  Have tested approximately 2500 agency deer and elk exhibiting clinical signs.  Have confirmed over 800 positive deer and approximatley 19 positive elk. Have confirmed CWD in 50 counties. Illegal to hunt within 200 yards of an area that has been baited in the last 10 days prior to hunting season.  Baiting is legal, but hunting over bait is not legal. Not banned at this time, but it is illegal to hunt over bait. NA Yes Yes
Nevada Nevada Department of Wildlife. Contact: Dr. Nate LaHue, 775-688-1813, nate.lahue@ndow.org.  The Nevada Department of Agriculture state veterinarian has regulatory authority over captive cervids. Contact: Amy Mitchell amitchell@agri.nv.gov,   State Veterinarian, Nevada Department of Agriculture NA Import of most live cervids prohibited Language passed by the legislature to prohibit the importation of hunter-killed cervid carcasses or parts of cervid carcasses from CWD positive jurisdictions except for: de-boned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps from which all soft tissue has been removed, upper canine teeth, hides or capes with no part of the head attached, finished taxidermy mounts, and tissue prepared and packaged for use by diagnostic or research laboratories.  Commercially sold cervid urine also counts as a body part and is illegal to sell within the state of NV. No legal captive cervid ranches exist in the state. This was allowed until July 2005.  Surveillance and testing have been conducted annually since 1998. To date, no positive mule deer or elk have been identified.  In 2020 our focus is on targeted surveillance of hunter harvested adult animals in the Eastern 1/3 of the state (on UT border) as well as road-killed adults (male and female) from the rest of the state with a focus on the I-80 and I-50 corridors. Any sick cervid and any necropsied cervid will also be tested. No No This language passed and NV prohibits the importation of hunter-killed cervid carcasses or parts of cervid carcasses from CWD positive jurisdictions except for: de-boned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps from which all soft tissue has been removed, upper canine teeth, hides or capes with no part of the head attached, finished taxidermy mounts, and tissue prepared and packaged for use by diagnostic or research laboratories.  NA No
New Hampshire* NH Fish & Game Department. Contact: Dan Bergeron, 603-271-2461, Daniel.Bergeron@wildlife.nh.gov.                                    NH Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food, Contact: Dr. Steven Crawford, State Veterinarian, 603-271-2404, scrawford@agr.state.nh.us Dept. of Ag. requires certificate of veterinary innspection and import permit.  Certificate shall certify that cervids are individually identified with permanent metal ear tag, legible tattoo or microchip, that all individuals on premises have been inspected,  that cervids have never been exposed to animals confirmed to have CWD or animals exposed to confirmed CWD animals. Fish and Game prohibits the importation of native cervid species (white-tailed deer and moose). Dept. of Ag. requires that cervids can only be imported into herds participating in NH or federal CWD monitoring program at a level consistent with 5 years participation. Herds of origin must meet at least the same standard. Once imported, individual cervids may never be transferred to another herd  within New Hampshire. In light of New York's testing of over 7,300 deer in their CWD Containment Area over a 5-year period with no additional positives, and their decision to officially decommission the containment area in 2010, New Hampshire exempted New York from its list of CWD postive jurisdictions to again allow carcass importation from New York beginnig in 2012. New Hampshire hunters are being warned that at present, transport of NY deer into or though MA and VT remains illegal. Voluntary CWD testing and certification program through state Dept. of Agriculture Statewide monitoring & surveillance of hunter killed wild deer began in 2002. Objective is to test a minimum of 400 samples annually plus targeted surveillance. Since 2002, a total of 7,154 hunter killed deer have been tested statewide. None have tested positive to date.    No ban at this time.  No ban, encouraging people not to feed deer. Rules prohibit the importation of hunter-killed cervid carcasses or parts of cervid carcasses from CWD positive jurisdictions except for: de-boned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps from which all soft tissue has been removed, upper canine teeth, hides or capes with no part of the head attached, finished taxidermy mounts, and tissue prepared and packaged for use by diagnostic or research laboratories. CWD positive jurisdictions are defined as states or provinces in which CWD has been found in wild or captive cervids. Beginning in 2012, New York has been exempted from New Hampshire's list of CWD postive jurisdictions. No No
New Jersey* Division of Fish and Wildlife has possession permitting authority. Contact: Carole Stanko carole.stanko@dep.nj.gov, 609-984-6295. The NJ Department of Agriculture, State Veterinarian has condemnation authority and authority over health certification requirements for imports. Contact: Dr. Manoel Tamassia, Manoel.tamassia@ag.state.nj.us, 609-671-6400. The USDA-VS Area Veterinarian-in-Charge has authority to enforce federal importation regulations. Contact: Dr. Michael Kornreich, 609-259-5260.  Ban on the importation of white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, mule deer, red deer, sika deer, reindeer, elk, and moose. Ban on the imporatation of carcasses or non-taxidermied heads from any jurisdiction, Ban on the possession, sale, and use of all deer-derived hunting lures, ban on the importation of cervid semen. The authority to ban rehab and baiting in established Disease Surviellence Areas. Ban on the importation of white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, mule deer, red deer, sika deer, reindeer, elk, and moose All cervids   Reports of unexplained deaths with preservation of specimens for CWD testing required for captive cervids.
 
Surveillance includes testing of hunter-killed and symptomatic wild deer. Surveillance began in 1997 and has been conducted annually since 2002. From 1997 to 2020,  9,842 wild deer have been tested for CWD, and all were not positive. No ban. No ban, discourage supplemental feeding. Yes. Only boned meat, taxidermied heads, clean skull caps and antlers, and buglers allowed. No No
New Mexico New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, Contact for special permits: Monique White, Law Enforcement Division, 505-476-8064; Contact for Wildlife health issues: Kerry Mower, 505-476-8080, kerry.mower@state.nm.us Under statutory authority, the Director of New Mexico Department of Game and Fish has declared a moritorium on importation of cervids into New Mexico.  This moratorium was declared because of the rapid spread of CWD across the nation.  The duration of this moritorium is indefinite.  Under normal circumstances, New Mexico allows importation of cervids from facilities certified through USDA approved herd certification program. Source herds must be located in an area free of CWD.  Permit to import cervids requires $500 application fee, 2 forms of approved identification, health certificate, Tuberculosis, Johne's, and Brucellosis testing.  Movements of cervids within New Mexico requires advance written notice, 2 forms of animal ID, and a health certificate. Enrollment in Herd Certification Program is voluntary.  Any CWD event in a game park will result in mandatory quarantine and surveillance for that facility.  CWD management actions and herd plan will be determined collaboratively among owners, Department of Game and Fish, New Mexico Livestock Board, and USDA APHIS. Regulations for game park operation and for importation into game parks were revised to reflect requirements of the Herd Certification Program.  Revision of both game park regulations and importation regulations are under review and slated for revision and modification. New Mexico Department of Game and Fish administers the Herd Certification Program.  Testing for herds not enrolled in the Herd Certification Program is voluntary. Testing is required for herds enrolled in the Herd Certification Program. Testing costs are borne by owners. Surveillance includes statewide random tissue collection from hunter-killed elk and deer combined with targeted collection from high-risk areas and from suspect animals. Hunters in Game Management Units 19 and 28 are required to submit tissues for testing.  All hunters who submit valid tissue samples are eligible for premier hunt opportunities awarded through lottery. All reports of sick and abnormal animals are investigated by New Mexico Department of Game and Fish; all abnormal deer and elk are collected and tested. per Subsection I of 19.31.10 NMAC Hunting and Fishing - Manner and Method of Taking, Use of Baits or Scents: It shall be unlawful for anyone to take or attempt to take any protected species by use of baits or scents as defined in Subsection P of 19.31.7 NMAC. Scent masking agents on one's person are allowed. (This regulation is in reference to animals in the wild and not in Class "A" Game Parks).   Per Subsection D. of 19.03.2 NMAC Depredation Assistance Causing a Nuisance Game Animal Problem: It shall be unlawful for any person, by intention or through negligence, to cause a nuisance game animal problem by baiting, or otherwise enticing game animals to an area, and such persons, if convicted, may be punished under 17-2-10 NMSA 1978. Per Subsection D. of 19.03.2 NMAC Depredation Assistance Causing a Nuisance Game Animal Problem: It shall be unlawful for any person, by intention or through negligence, to cause a nuisance game animal problem by baiting, or otherwise enticing game animals to an area, and such persons, if convicted, may be punished under 17-2-10 NMSA 1978. Only boned meat, cleaned and decontaminated skull caps, hides, and ivories can be removed from any designated area where CWD has been confirmed.  Carcasses must be discarded in the field or incinerated. None.  Yes, deer in Organ Mtns, Sacramento Mtns, McGregor Range, and a single case from San Andres Mtns.  Elk from Sacramento Mtns.
New York NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) regulates deer and elk held under wire. Contact cervidfarm@agriculture.ny.gov,  518-457-3502.      NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) issues licenses to possess captive-bred white-tailed deer. Contact Joseph Therrien, [joseph.therrien@dec.ny.gov], 518-402-8985.  For Wild deer - NYS DEC Kevin Hynes [kevin.hynes@dec.ny.gov] 518-478-3034.   NYSDAM prohibits importation of CWD-susceptible species.  DEC requires a person to obtain a license from NYS DEC to possess captive-bred white-tailed deer.  DEC collaborates with NYSDAM on all aspects of disease management involving cervids. NYSDAM prohibits importation of CWD-susceptible species. White-tailed-deer, elk, red deer, sika deer and other CWD susceptible species must either be on the CWD Certified Herd Certification Program (HCP) or else be on the CWD monitoring program.  Herds on CWD HCP must have adequate handling and restraint facilities Adequate fencing and storage for CWD and TB samples is required.  All deer and elk herds must be tuberculosis tested every 5 years or be on a slaughter surveillance program for TB.  

NYSDEC's CWD regulation is 6 NYCRR Part 189.  This regulation prohibits the feeding of wild deer and wild moose and lists requirements for importing hunter-killed deer, elk and moose into NY.  See text of DEC CWD regulation at www.dec.ny.gov/regs/2494.html.  BE ADVISED THAT  NYSDEC  AMENDED THEIR CWD REGULATIONS IN 2019 TO PROHIBIT CERTAIN ACTIVITIES THAT POSE A HIGH RISK OF INTRODUCING CWD INTO NEW YORK. 
NYSDAM prohibits the importation of live CWD susceptible animals. NYSDEC amended their CWD Regulation (Part 189) in  2019 to prohibit certain activities that pose a high risk of introducing CWD into New York. The new regulation prohibits the importation of any intact cervid carcasses or parts from any State or Province. New York State DAM currently pays for all required testing.  HCP herds must test all natural and harvest mortalities. The monitoring program for herds not selling live animals consists of reporting and sampling all natural deaths and having a total annual number of samples equal to 10% of the adult population.  DEC requires that all people who have been issued a license from the DEC to possess captive bred white-tailed deer comply with NYSDAM provisions for CWD testing.  DEC began a statewide CWD surveillance program for wild white-tailed deer in 2002.  CWD surveillance has continued in each successive year. Surveillance program includes risk-based sampling of hunter harvested deer and examination of any reported sick or abnormal deer.   Baiting of wild white-tailed deer has always been prohibited in New York State.  See text of NYSDEC CWD regulation at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/28182.html  DEC has prohibited the feeding of wild white-tailed deer since July 2002.   Individuals are allowed to plant food crops for wild deer and to feed wild deer for scientific research, wildlife damage abatement, and wildlife population reduction but only under a license from the NYSDEC.  See full text of NYS DEC's CWD regs at https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7197.html   NYSDEC's CWD Regulation, 6 NYCRR Part 189 prohibits the importation of specific parts from captive or captive bred cervids and wild cervids and moose coming from outside New York. Hunters are prohibited from returning to New York with whole carcasses or intact heads of deer, elk, moose, or caribou that they harvest anywhere outside of New York. Only the deboned meat, cleaned skull cap with no visible brain tissue, antlers with no flesh adhering, raw or processed cape or hide, cleaned teeth or lower jaw, and finished taxidermy products of CWD-susceptible animals may be brought into New York. See full text of CWD regulation for details at https://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/8325.html   Yes. Confirmed in captive white-tailed deer in March/April 2005.  No new cases have been found in captive herds since April 2005 and CWD surveillance continues on all cervid farms pursuant to the NYSDAM CWD regulation. Yes. Confirmed in two wild white-tailed deer in April 2005.  No new cases have been found in wild white-tailed deer in New York since April 2005. NYSDEC continues to conduct CWD surveillance during the hunting season and tests all deer exhibiting clinical signs.
North Carolina* North Carolina has two regulatory agencies overseeing Cervidae programs.

The NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS) has regulatory authority over farmed Cervidae. For farmed Cervidae questions, contact farmedcervid@ncagr.gov; Michael Mayes, NCDA&CS 919-707-3254, Michael.Mayes@ncagr.gov; or Dr. Michael Neault, NCDA&CS 919-707-3272, Mike.Neault@ncagr.gov.

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) has regulatory authority of free-range Cervidae and the transportation of untagged cervids. For free-range Cervidae questions, contact Merril Cook at 919-707-0075 or Merril.Cook@ncwildlife.org.
Farmed cervid owners are required to be licensed and must obtain a transportation permit for animal movement (importation, exportation, intrastate transportation, emergency vet, and slaughterhouse permits). NCDA&CS regulates facility standards as defined in the USDA program standards, Chronic Wasting Disease testing, cervid tagging, record-keeping, completes annual record inspections and every three-year onsite hands-on inspection, regulates the production of meat, and holds premises quarantine authority through the State Veterinarian. Rules are found in the NCDA&CS administrative code 02 NCAC, Subchapter 52L - Farmed Cervids, .0101 - .0402 (effective June 1, 2018). NCDA&CS has banned importation of USDA CWD susceptible species, caribou, muntjac, and reindeer into North Carolina; and the remaining USDA Non-susceptible species may only be imported into the State of North Carolina from a herd in which CWD has not been detected and is not allowed from a county that has had a positive case of CWD or is contiguous to a county (meaning, a county that is adjacent to) that had a positive case of CWD. Cervid imported into North Carolina shall be individually identified by 840 RFID tags that shall be affixed by the exporter. Full regulations may be found in the NCDA&CS administrative code 02 NCAC, Subchapter 52L - Farmed Cervids, .0101 - .0402 (effective June 1, 2018) ), and importation requirements are found in 02 NCAC 52B .0213. NCDA&CS does not have any new regulations in development Testing of all captive cervids ≥ 12 months of age that die for any reason, and testing of all captive cervids displaying symptoms characteristic of the disease required. Licensees are required to submit cervid heads or carcasses to the NCDA&CS diagnostic laboratory for testing. Samples are taken and then sent by NCDA&CS to the NAHLN lab in Wisconsin for CWD evaluation. CWD has not been detected in any of the samples from farmed cervids. All animals that are exhibiting symptoms characteristic of CWD are tested. Statewide surveillance with an objective of collecting a minimum of 1,000 samples was conducted in 2003, 2008, and 2013. Beginning fiscal year 2018-19, a more intense annual surveillance will be implemented with county sampling goals that span over the next 5 years. As of April 15, 2021, a total of 15,254 white-tailed deer and elk have been tested (522 clinical, 14,697 routine surveillance, 98 illegally imported deer). CWD has not been detected. No ban at this time. No ban at this time. "It is unlawful to import, transport, or possess a cervid carcass or cervid carcass parts originating from outside north Carolina, except for the following: meat that has been boned out such that no pieces or fragments of bone remain; caped hides with no part of the skull or spinal column attached; antlers, antlers attached to cleaned skull plates, or skulls free from meat or brain tissue attached; cleaned lower jawbone(s) with teeth or cleaned teeth; or finished taxidermy products and tanned hides. All carcass part(s) or their containers must be labeled with the individual's name and address; state, Canadian province, or foreign country of origin; date the cervid was killed; and the individual's hunting license number, permit number, or equivalent identification from the state, Canadian province, or foreign country of origin. Rule [15A NCAC 10B.0124]." No No
North Dakota State Board of Animal Health; Contact Dr. Beth Carlson, bwcarlson@nd.gov 701-328-2654.  North Dakota Game & Fish: Contact Dr. Charlie Bahnson, cbahnson@nd.gov, 701-202-0775 Facilities must be approved prior to ownership of deer and elk, and deer owners must obtain a non-traditional livestock license.  Captive cervids must meet standards of risk assessment.  Must be free of all contagious and infectious disease.  Genetic testing (for purity) required for elk in ND zones 1 & 2.  Animals must not be infected with or exposed to Johne's disease.  Must be negative to two official brucellosis tests, one being the CF. Whole herd TB test within 12 months. In lieu of testing, Brucellosis-free and TB-free herd status is recognized.  Annual inventory reports required for all cervids.  Deer must be individually identified with USDA silver tag by 12 months of age, and elk by 24 months of age.  Additional restricitons apply to reindeer, red deer, and red deer/elk hybrids.   For importation: Must complete CWD 5-Year Risk Assessment Questionnaire (or have 5 year status) and fax to Board of Animal Health prior to entry permit issuance; cervids and originating herds must have no history of emaciation, depression, excessive salivation or thirst, or neurological disease.  If symptoms arise, diagnostic measures must be taken to rule out a TSE. NA Board of Animal Health has mandatory inventory (since 1993). CWD testing was mandatory (since 1998) for farmed elk, white-tailed deer and mule deer over 12 months of age that die for any reason.  As of November 1, 2013, over 9900 farmed deer and elk have been tested, with no evidence of CWD. As of October 2017 participation in the CWD testing program has become voluntary. ND Game & Fish Department has conducted Targeted Surveillance of free-ranging cervids since 1996.  Hunter-harvested deer and elk surveillance began in 2002.  As of April 1, 2020, approximately 3000 animals are tested annually. CWD was first detected in Sioux County in 2009 and was detected in neighboring Grant County soon afterward. CWD was detected in Divide County in 2018; Williams and McKenzie counties in 2019; and Bottineau county in 2020.   Deer Hunting Units 3E1, 3E2, 3F1, 3F2, 3C west of the Missouri River; 3A1, 3A2, 3A3, 3A4, 3B1, 4A, 4B, 4C. Banned in State Wildlife Management Areas and Federal Lands. Ban on importation of whole carcasses and carcass parts of white-tailed deer, mule deer and elk harveseted outside North Dakota and hunting units in ND where CWD has been detected.  Hunters may import the following parts: meat that is cut and wrapped (commercially or privately), quarters or other portions of meat with no part of spinal column or head attached, boned out meat, hides without heads attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached, antlers with no meat or tissue attached, upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, or ivories), and finished taxidermy heads. No Yes
Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife - Issues permits for white-tailed deer in captivity and carcass regulations. Contact: Michele Welsh, michele.welsh@dnr.ohio.gov Department of Agriculture for import requirements and permits.  Contact Cindy Bodie,  cindy.bodie@agri.ohio.gov Brucellosis within 30 days prior to entry or certified brucellosis free herd status. Negative whole herd tuberculosis test within 12 months prior to movement and negative individual tuberculosis test within 90 days prior to entry or accredited herd status. Must be free of symptoms of CWD.  no importations from quarantine premises or area. Imported animals shall not originate within 15 miles of a CWD positive animal (wild or captive). Documentation will be required prior to issuing permit.  Documentation will be required prior to issuing permit. no importation from quarantined premises or area. Fence heights on capitve facility may be no less than 92 inches in height. Reporting of escapees mandatory and it is illegal to release a captive cervid into wild. ALL captive white-tailed deer are required to be licensed by ODA. Effective nov 19, 2018, changes were made to Chapter 901:1 of Ohio Revised Code, Chronic Wasting Disease. Rule now requires that all owners of captive white-tailed deer must ensure perimeter fencing prevents ingress/egress of cervids, inspect their perimeter fences on weekly basis, and document these inspections. All permit holders must maintain a record showing that they have inspected their fences on weekly basis. All escapes must be reported immediately to the Department and any escaped animal which is not returned to premise within 24 hours may not be returned to facility. All animals over 12 months of age must bear 2 types of ID: official ID and another form of unique visible ID. Official ID is limited to an official USDA metal eartag bearing an alphanumeric ID number, approved visual or electronic radio frequency ID, or a microchip using described frequencies. Other than establishment of a new Disease Surveillance Area (DSA), there are no new regulations being discussed at this time. All animals over one-year of age which die for any reason must be tested for chronic wasting disease. This includes monitored herds and hunting preserves.  Agreement form must be completed. Preserves are required to test 100% of all shooting mortalities.   Targeted CWD surveillance on free ranging white-tailed deer began in 2002 and is performed annually.   Risk-based statewide surveillance of primarily road-killed deer used to monitor for CWD with an additional 50 suspect animals tested annually. Piloted a statewide taxidermist project in 2018 to sample mature bucks.  Beginning in 2019, we began testing deer from all 88 counties.  Historically, testing was limited to just 58 counties.  Coincidentally, this expanded testing yielded our first wild CWD-positive deer.   Only within our Disease Surveillance Areas (DSAs).   Only within our Disease Surveillance Areas (DSAs).  Ohio Administrative Code 1501:31-19-02 makes it illegal for any person to possess all or any part of a CWD-susecptible cervidae carcass from anywhere outside the state of Ohio except when the cervidae carcass consists only of any of the following:  (1) De-boned meat; (2) Meat that is cut and securely and completely wrapped either commercially or privately with no part of the spinal column or head attached;  (3) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; (4) Antlers; (5) Antlers attached to a skull cap from which all soft tissue has been removed; (6) Upper canine teeth from which all soft tissue has been removed; (7) Hides and capes without any part of the head or lymph nodes attached; (8) Finished taxidermy mounts;.  In an effort to strike a balance between risk of disease introduction and customer service, a certification program was developed for taxidermists and processors in the Fall of 2020 that would allow them to receive CWD-susceptible species, provided that they met the requirements for certification and the animal was delivered to their shop within 24 hours of entering the state.  Those opting out of the certification program would be in violation of the law if they accept CWD-susceptible cervids from out of state.  These same rules apply to our Disease Surveillance Area(s).  You cannot move high-risk parts out of these DSAs unless you are transporting the deer to a certified processor or taxidermist. Yes, three facilities in Holmes County and one in Wayne County.  All have been depopulated. Yes, Wyandot County.
Oklahoma Farmed Cervidae and Cervid Imports: Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry (Contact: Dr. Justin Roach, 405-522-6128 or justin.roach@ag.ok.gov).                                             Native Cervidae and Hunting Facilities:                        Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (Contact: Dallas Barber, dallas.barber@odwc.ok.gov) Tuberculosis testing requirements must meet one of the following for all captive cervids over six months of age: tested negative to 2 official tuberculosis tests conducted no less than 90 days apart with the 2nd test conducted within 90 days prior to entry, originate from a Qualified Herd and tested negative to an official Tuberculosis test within 90 days prior to entry, or originate from an Accredited Free Herd.  Brucellosis requirements must meet one of the following for all captive elk over six months of age: tested negative for brucellosis within 30 days prior to entry, or originate from a Brucellosis Certified Herd. Restricts import of cervids from all counties and provinces where CWD has been identified in free-ranging cervid populations.  All other cervid imports require the source herd to be certified in a federally approved CWD herd certification program. None Mandatory testing of off all deaths 12 months of age or old from herds participating in the CWD herd certification program. Since 1999 through 2018 more than 11,000 white tailed deer, mule deer, and elk have been tested in wild poopulations, with no positive finding. No ban at this time. No ban at this time. The restriction states that no one shall import, transport, or possess any cervid carcass or part of a cervid carcass from outside Oklahoma's boundaries, except for: antlers, or antlers attached to clean skull plate, or cleaned skulls (all tissue removed); animal quarters containing no spinal material, or meat with all parts of the spinal column removed; cleaned teeth; finished taxidermy products; hides or tanned products. Yes, in a captive elk herd.  The herd in question was depopulated September 2002. An Additional Captive facility was positive in 2019 and depopulated June of 2019.  No
Oregon Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (primary jursdiction)  Dr. Colin Gillin, State Wildlife Veterinarian, colin.m.gillin@odfw.oregon.gov, 541-757-5232 or                                                                                                                Oregon Department of Agriculture (import, reportable animal disease, quarantine jurisdiction) State Veterinarian, Dr. Ryan Scholz, rscholz@oda.state.or.us, 503-580-4986 Since June 2009, captive cervid producers may enroll in a Voluntary CWD Monitored Herd program via application to the Wildlife Division Administrator.  As a condition for monitored herd status, all captive North American deer and elk 6 months of age or older and dying of any cause, must be sampled for CWD by a federally accredited veterinarian, or an ODFW or federal veterinarian  or at a veterinary diagnostic laboratory by a veterinary pathologist.  Submissions must be sent to NVSL by the accredited veterinarian or pathologist.See next section for Chronic Wasting Disease Regulations for Captive Cervids and Wildlife . 11/08/02: The Oregon Fish & Wildlife Commission  (Commission) issued a regulation imposing a  permanent ban on the importation of  live cervids (except  fallow deer or reindeer originating from Oregon and used for educational or display purposes).  This regulation  was adopted as a risk reduction measure involving the potential import of  CWD  and transmission of the disease to the  state's cervid populations (wild and farmed). June 2009 - Mandatory mortality reporting and CWD testing of all North American captive cervids 6 months of age or older and dying of any cause (Oregon Administrative Rule 635-049-0065.)  No  Mandatory CWD testing is required of all captive cervids dying of any cause 6 months of age or older.  Herds not enrolled in the Voluntary CWD Monitored Herd program may have CWD samples collected and submitted by anyone of the producers choosing, which may or may not include a federally accredited veterinarian. All CWD sampling results are sent by NVSL, the accredited veterinarian, or the producer to the Wildlife Health Lab for entry and tracking into a Captive Cervid Database.  Since 2002-03, a total of 23,310 hunter-harvested and targeted surveillance deer and elk have been tested statewide.  To date, 4,480 black-tailed deer, 8,005 mule deer, 452 white-tailed deer, 4,190 Roosevelt elk and 6,183 Rocky Mtn elk have been tested.  All 23,310 samples tested were negative for CWD. No ban at this time. No ban at this time. Except for the following parts, importation of a cervid carcass or parts of a cervid carcass from another state or country is prohibited.  This include cervid carcass parts containing central nervous system tissue. Parts allowed for import from CWD endemic areas are: 1) Meat cut and wrapped commercially or privately; 2)  Meat that has been boned out; 3) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; 4) Hides and/or capes with no head attached; 5) Skull plates with antlers attached that have been cleaned of all meat and brain tissue (velvet antlers are allowed); 6) Antlers with no tissue attached (velvet antlers are allowed); 7) Upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories); 8) Finished taxidermy heads No No
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture contact Dr. David Zellner, dzellner@pa.gov; or Jody Boyer 717-787-4944, jodyboyer@pa.gov, PA Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Health, Rm 412, 2301 N Cameron St., Harrisburg, PA 17110. Additional requirements: 5) If from a state that had Vesicular Stomatitis in the last 12 months, a statement must be included, "All animals identified on this certificate of veterinary inspection have been examined and found to be free from VS. During the past 90 days, these animals were not located within 10 miles of a site where VS has been diagnosed."  6) Source herd shall be greater than 15 miles of a CWD positive animal, either free-ranging or captive.   CWD susceptible cervids must be from a CWD Herd Certification program participant at the Certified level.  Movement is permitted from endemic areas and states if the source herd is greater than 15 miles away from CWD positive animals, either wild or captive. Last regulations were published in April 2014.  New regulations presently in development. PDA:  A two tiered CWD surveillance program that includes the voluntary herd certification program or a mandatory monitoring program.  This has been in place since March 2007.  Surveillance for CWD in Pennsylvania has been ongoing since 1998 when the Game Commission began testing of deer and elk that exhibited clinical signs consistent with the disease. Surveillance efforts have expanded significantly since then and samples are currently collected from hunters voluntarily submitting deer heads into collection bins following harvest (within Disease Management Areas), meat processors during the Game Commission's statewide annual deer aging operations, road-killed cervids, all harvests of  elk, and any clinical suspects. As of June 30, 2021, more than 108,000 free-ranging deer and 1,600 free-ranging elk have been tested for CWD in the Commonwealth; CWD has been detected in a total of 734 deer and zero elk. State law prohibits baiting throughout most of the state, but regulations have been created to allow its use to assist in urban deer removal on a limited basis in SE Pennsylvania.  State law currently allows the feeding of deer, but it is unlawful to take advantage of or make use of a feeding (baited) area while hunting.  Feeding of elk has been banned since 1995.  Statewide feeding of deer has not yet been banned, but PGC is promoting this action. However, as called for in the CWD Response Plan our Executive Director has been given the necessary authority to enact emergency regulations, including a ban of feeding of deer. Feeding is now prohibited in the DMAs. High risk parts from hunter-killed animals have been banned from ALL states and provinces outside of PA regardless of CWD status. High risk parts from wild cervids harvested within the DMAs and the Established Area may not be removed. Details are available on the PGC website. Yes Yes
Rhode Island* Department of Environmental Management, Division of Fish & WildlifeContact: Brian Tefft brian.tefft@dem.ri.gov 7/15/05 regulation: Prohibit importation of all captive and wild cervids from CWD endemic areas, & captives from a CWD free status herd (5+ years) herd (replaces previous moratorium).  Additional regulations: Must originate from a federally accredited TB free herd; negative anaplasmosis/blue-tongue test (within 30 days of import) still apply. 7/15/05:  regulation: Prohibit importation of all captive and wild cervids from CWD endemic areas, & captives from a CWD free status herd (5+ years) herd (replaces previous moratorium).    (Previous regulations: Require proof that there is no current or past history of contact with or exposure to any potential CWD animals or states affected by CWD.) NA Test all captive cervids over 16 months that die (including slaughter), require perimeter fencing preventing ingress/egress of cervids, annual herd inventory, designation of herd status, must report herd additions. Have conducted stratified random and targeted surveillance since 2002.  Current target is for the collection of 190 random samples as well as any suspect deer.  To date we have tested 2020 deer all which tested negetive.  We have focused on hunter killed deer (approximately 160 annually) and random collections (road kills approximately 30 annually) to develop our sample.     Baiting currently prohibited. No person shall feed cervids at anytime unless part of a bona fide research, bona fide agricultural practices, wildlife food plots, brush cutting or bird feeding from elevated feeders within 100 feet of dwelling. Permanent regulations 7/14/05: no person shall import or posses brain, eyes, spinal cord, lymph nodes, tonsils or spleen of any cervid from a CWD endemic area or from a captive herd. No No
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has ultimate control over importation and possession of captive cervids.  Clemson University Livestock and Poultry Health also provides permit if and only if the DNR has previously permitted importation of the cervid.  Contact: Charles Ruth, SCDNR, ruthc@dnr.sc.gov                Other than an occasional permit for temporary exhibition (e.g. reindeer at Christmas shows) and one dated permit for a small number of privately held fallow deer, importation of cervids has not been permitted (SC Code Section 50-16-20).  As of May 2002, no more permits for temporary exhibition. Importation of cervids has never been permitted. NA NA 1998-2001 participated in CWD surveillance with SCWDS (targeted surveillance).  In addition to targeted surveillance during 2002-2004 conducted active surveillance on approximately 500 hunter killed deer annually.  In 2005 conducted targeted surveillance only.  In 2006 active surveillance reinstated and continued thru 2012.  With loss of federal funding only targeted surveillance since. Total deer tested over all years approximately 6,000. Hunting over bait was historically prohibited in 18 of 46 SC counties.   By legislative action in 2013 hunting over bait is not prohibited statewide. No.  However, in June 2003 a comprehensive wildlife disease control law (SC Code 50-11-105) was passed.  This law provides broad emergency powers to SCDNR and the agency believes this would include a ban on both baiting and feeding should a serious disease issue arise. 08/15/03: Emergency regulation restricting the importation of deer and elk carcass parts from states diagnosed with CWD. Regulation became permanent 4/2004.   Exceptions to the restriction include: quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, boned out meat, hides without heads attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull or skull plates with antlers attached, antlers (detached from skull plate), clean upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers, ivories), and finished taxidermy heads. In 2019 regulation prohibiting the use of commercial natural urine products with the exception of those taken by a hunter from deer killed in SC. No No
South Dakota Animal Industry Board.  Contact: Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, dustin.oedekoven@state.sd.us Negative TB test of herd of origin within one year prior to entry AND Negative single-cervical test or Dual Path Platform (DPP) test of individual animals within 90 days prior to entry.
DPP test is approved only for elk, red deer, white-tailed deer, fallow deer, and reindeer.
Negative TB test exception: Animals coming from an Accredited Tuberculosis Free herd with a current test date.  Individual official identification number and an additional form of visible individual identification, all cervidae imported to SD must originate from a Certified CWD herd. Visit https://aib.sd.gov/imports.html  for importation requirements for all animals. 
All cervidae must originate from a state which has an Approved State CWD Herd Certification Program and originate from a herd which has a certified CWD free status. No animal may originate from or be a member of a herd which has had CWD diagnosed in the past 5 years. Also, No animal may have been part of a CWD traceback or traceforward herd in the past 5 years.  No new regulations are being discussed.  Monitor occurrence and distribution of CWD, captive cervid farms are required to keep inventory and report any additions, disappearances or illnesses which may be submitted for diagnosis.  Participation in the Herd Certification Program (HCP) is voluntary as of April, 2012.  In the voluntary HCP, CWD testing is required for all captive cervids 12 months of age or older which die of any cause.  From 1997 to April 2021, 31,551 free-ranging cervids (7,888 Elk, 16,817 WTD, 6,846 MD) have been tested for CWD.  The first hunter-harvested CWD-positive was identified in 2001.  To date, 603 animals have been found as CWD-positive (245 Elk, 243 WTD, 115 MD) in 16 counties in SD . Cervid surveillance in Wind Cave National Park has revealed 171 positive animals (158 Elk, 3 WTD, 10 MD).  Cervid surveillance in Custer State Park has confirmed 12 deer and 33 elk with CWD.  Recent surveillance has confirmed an additional 3 counties in western SD and 1 county in eastern SD with the disease, bringing the total endemic counties in SD to sixteen.  Surveillance for CWD in free-ranging cervids in other areas of SD will continues to determine presence/absence of the disease.  Hunters may not use salt blocks or licks or bait station to attract big game.  "Bait station" is a place where edible foodstuffs or minerals are placed or maintained as an attractant to game animals.  Use of scent alone does not constitute a bait station. No ban at this time. The South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) Commission has revised regulations that are in place for the 2021 deer and elk hunting seasons. Carcass transportation and disposal regulations will apply for any harvested deer or elk that will be transported from the county of harvest or from another state back into South Dakota. gfp.sd.gov/2021-cwd-regulations. Yes Yes
Tennessee Tennessee Department of Agriculture
ALEXA MCCOURT, DVM |Staff Veterinarian
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Ellington Agricultural Center
Box 40627
Nashville, TN 37220
Phone:  615-837-5120   Fax:  615-837-5250
alexa.mccourt@tn.gov
www.tn.gov/agriculture
Intrastate movement and maintenance
Any person who holds captive cervidae within the state must:
(i) Annually report to the department herd inventory, including the location, number and species of cervidae held, on or before February 1 of each year on forms provided by the department;
(ii) Immediately report to the department any captive cervidae illness or death within 24 hours of discovery; and,
(iii) Make the carcass of any dead captive cervidae available to the department for testing ordered by the state veterinarian.
No person shall move captive cervidae within the state unless:
(i) The cervidae is identified by two forms of identification, one of which must be an official tag or microchip used within the department's CWD Herd Certification Program; and,
(ii) The state veterinarian has provided prior written approval authorizing the movement.
Tennessee has an approved, voluntary Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and recognizes the certified status of herds with completion of 5+ years monitoring
Importation (CWD section):
(i) No person shall import CWD susceptible cervidae from an area where CWD has been detected by a state or federal animal health control official. The control zone around such area shall be 50 miles in radius, unless otherwise ordered by the state veterinarian for good cause shown.
(ii) Any person who imports CWD susceptible cervidae shall have in his possession:
(I) Proof that the cervidae originated from a certified status herd that has not suffered a loss or reduction in status during its program enrollment; and,
(II) A certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI), completed in full; and, an entry permit, obtained by the veterinarian issuing the CVI, for the cervidae.
NA Surveillance performed on a voluntary basis, except mandatory for those facilities in or working toward certification. Mandatory testing on CWD susceptible cervids held and harvested on wildlife preserves. Wildlife preserves may only obtain CWD susceptible cervids from certified  herds. Beginning in 2018, our CWD surveillance employed a risk-based weighted surveillance strategy that led to the detection of 10 CWD positive deer in Fayette and Hardeman counties in December of 2018. In order to monitor CWD where it is known to be present and continue surveillance in the rest of the state, we have developed an extensive hunter service testing program that includes partnering with meat processors, taxidermists, testing laboratories, TN Wildlife Federation, Cornell University, and more,.  From implementation of the surveillance strategy in 2018 and the end of the 2020-2021 deer season, we have tested over 42,000 deer for CWD.  Most of these deer are hunter harvested, but roadkill and clinical deer are tested as well.  We have a targeted removal program and a CWD Management Permit for landowners program, both of which incorporate CWD testing for free-ranging Cervids.   No baiting allowed. Feeding is banned in positive CWD counties & high risk CWD counties with the following exceptions: (a)feed placed within one hundred (100) feet of any residence or occupied building; or (b) feed placed in such a manner to reasonably exclude access by deer; or (c) feed placed as part of a wild hog management effort authorized by the agency; or (d) feed and minerals present solely as a result of normal agricultural practices, normal forest management practices, or crop and wildlife food production practices. A high risk CWD county is any county that does not have a confirmed case of CWD but is within 10 miles of a confirmed case of CWD. No person may import, transport, or possess in Tennessee a cervid carcass or carcass part from anywhere outside state except as provided herein:
(a) Meat that has bones removed; (b) Antlers, antlers attached to cleaned skull plates, or cleaned skulls (where no meat or tissues are attached to the skull); (c) Cleaned teeth; (d) Finished taxidermy and antler products; (e) Hides and tanned products.

No person may export a cervid carcass or carcass part harvested from a high risk CWD county. Cervid carcasses or carcass parts harvested in a high risk CWD county may be exported from a high risk CWD county if:                    (a) The carcass parts are meat that has bones removed; (b) The carcass parts are antlers, antlers attached to cleaned skull plates, or cleaned skulls (where no meat or tissues are attached to the skull); (c) The carcass parts are cleaned teeth; (d) The carcass parts are finished taxidermy and antler products; (e) The carcass parts are hides and tanned products; (f) The carcass or carcass part is exported to another high risk CWD county and only transported through other high risk CWD counties; or (g) The carcass or carcass part is exported to a positive CWD county and only transported through high risk CWD counties or positive CWD counties, but in no event may a cervid carcass or carcass part be transported to another high risk CWD county through a positive CWD county.
A high risk CWD county is any county that does not have a confirmed case of CWD but is within 10 miles of a confirmed case of CWD. 
No Yes
Texas* Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)   Contact: Dr. Susan Rollo, susan.rollo@tahc.texas.gov                        Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD)        Contact:  Dr. Bob Dittmar, bob.dittmar@tpwd.texas.gov TAHC:  Elk imported from other states must be enrolled in an official CWD monitoring program for at least 3 years, imports from states with CWD must be enrolled in an official monitoring program for at least 5 years (2002).  TPWD: The importation of WTD and MD from out-of-state is prohibited. TPWD has jurisdiction over native wildlife: white-tailed deer and mule deer. TAHC has jurisdiction over "exotic wildlife" including elk, red deer and sika deer. TAHC:  Elk imported from other states must be enrolled in an official CWD monitoring program for at least 3 years, imports from states with CWD must be enrolled in an official monitoring program for at least 5 years (2002).  TPWD: To  move deer intrastate, WTD/MD breeding facilities must be enrolled in TAHC Herd Certification program and have attained 5th year status or higher; or tested 80% of mortalities 16 months of age and older annually, with a minimum number of not detected tests annually equal to 3.6% of the test eligible animals in the herd. Allows utilization of ante-mortem testing to meet some requirements (e.g., if no animals die in a report year, ante-mortem testing may satisfy the 3.6% requirement). Depending on source herd status, some release sites have testing requirements for hunter-harvested deer. TAHC &/or TPWD:  All captive WT deer, mule deer and elk must have a visible ear tag with a TPWD-assigned unique ID number printed/written on it.  Deer must have that same ID number tattooed in one ear prior to being transported from a breeding facility.   No new regulation at this time TAHC:  Voluntary status monitoring program  since 1999. Participating herds required to submit annual inventories and submission of samples from all cases of mortality in animals over 12 months of age.  TPWD: Mandatory herd monitoring for CWD on captive WT/MD herds in order to  move deer intrastate.  TPWD: Established protocols in free ranging native cervids for testing to detect CWD at 1% prevalence with 95-99% confidence. Annual surveillance goals are set with established protocols for each deer management unit (DMU) to attempt to achieve stratified sampling across the state. From July 2002 through March 2019, Texas has documented over 176,000 "Not Detected" samples with over 82,000 of those from free-ranging cervids though sampling of hunter-harvested, road kill and clinical animals. The remainder are through various permitted activities regulated by the state, including over 32,400 ante-mortem samples from captive white-tailed deer. To move free-ranging WTD/MD under a Trap, Transport and Transplant (TTT) permit, the trap site must provide 15 "Not Detected" test results annually prior to movement. TPWD and TAHC: Established  Containment and Surveillance Zones in those areas of the state where CWD has been detected in free-ranging cervid populations in West Texas, the Texas Panhandle and South-central Texas. There are regulations that include increased live animal movement restrictions, carcass movement restrictions, and mandatory testing of harvested susceptable species. TAHC: Requires testing of a minimun of the first 3 non-native susceptable species mortalities each year on a property. No ban at this time. 02/02/04: Prohibit the feeding of wildlife in state parks. Restrictions on movement of certain carcass parts into the state from CWD positive states and out of Containment and Surveillance Zones within the state. Yes Yes
Utah* Utah Division of Wildlife Resources: Contact Annette Roug aroug@utah.gov  Utah Department of Agriculture and Food, Animal Industry Division has jurisdiction over captive elk facilities.  Contact Leslie McFarlane, lamcfarlane@utah.gov CVI must state that cervid is not infected with Johne's, CWD or malignant catarrhal fever and may have never been east of the 100 degree meridian.  Must have all internal and external parasites treated. Must originate from state or province that requires all suspected/confirmed cases of CWD to be reported, state must have the authority to quarantine.  Elk must originate from states with implemented program for surveillance, control and eradication of CWD in domestic elk.  No elk from herd, trace-back herd  or adjacent herd diagnosed with CWD or elk exposed to or positive for CWD allowed for import. A CWD management plan was approved in the fall of 2019 Mandatory cervid farm testing,  must report any suspect or finding of CWD and must submit any elk over 12 months of age that dies for any reason for testing, captive hunting facilities must submit samples from 100% of all elk that are killed, slaughtered or destroyed. Have been testing wild cervids for CWD since 1998.  We have designed surveillance systems that incorporate hunter harvest, targeted surveillance of symptomatic or suspect animals and vehicle kill samples.  All sampling plans are designed to detect CWD if it occurs in 1% of the population with 95% confidence limits. NA NA Ban on hunter harvested animal parts from states where CWD has been detected. May import meat that is cut and wrapped either commercially or privately, quarters or other portion of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, meat that is boned out, hides with no heads attached, skulls and skull plates with antlers attached that have been cleaned of all brain matter and spinal column matter, antlers with no meat or tissue attached, upper canine teeth with no meat attached, and finished taxidermy heads. Yes Yes
Vermont* Department of Agriculture, Food & Markets is responsible for captive cervid importation, health certificate, facility standards. Contact state veterinarian Kristen Haas 802-828-2421.  Vermont Fish and Wildlife has jurisdiction over the single captive hunting facility. No new facilities will be allowed in the state. Red deer (elk), fallow deer, and reindeer are classified as domestic and governed by Agency of Agriculture. White-tailed deer and moose are native wild species and are not permitted to be held captive or privately owned.   (Previous regulations: Also test negative for anaplasmosis/blue tongue and vesicular stomatitis exposure.  Reindeer and red deer must be free of nematodes of subfamily Elaplostrangylinaee at the time of importation).  Importation restricted from CWD-positive states and provinces. Mandatory post-mortum CWD test of all captive red deer. Hunter-killed deer from CWD positive states and provinces must enter Vermont in 'boned' condition. No Captive cervid facilities required to perform CWD testing. In 2002 began testing hunter harvested cervids and performing targeted surveillance.  In 2010 switch to targeted surveillance occured.  Have collected over 2700 samples from hunter harvest and target animal surveillance through 2015 with no positives being detected to date.  Annual samples ~2-10. Deer baiting restriction was put into effect in 2005. Food may not be placed at the disposal of wildlife during any open deer season (a total of 50 days). A deer feeding restriction was put into effect In 2005. Bird feeding may continue as long as deer do not have access to the food. Incidental uptake of food by deer during livestock feeding is accepted. Food plots and agricultural spillage are not considered feeding. 08/21/02: It is illegal to import or posses deer or elk, or parts of deer or elk from Canadian provinces and states that have had CWD or from captive cervid facilities except for: meat that is cut up, packaged and labeled with hunting license information and not mixed with other deer or elk during processing, meat that is boneless, hides or capes with no parts of the heads attached, clean skull-cap with antlers attached, antlers with no other meat or tissue attached, finished taxidermy heads, upper canine teeth with no tissue attached. No No
Virginia The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (DWR) has the jurisdiction over captive cervids.  Contact DWR at 804-837-5666, Megan Kirchgessner, megan.kirchgessner@dwr.virginia.gov or 540-569-0023, Nelson Lafon, nelson.lafon@dwr.virginia.gov.  If captive cervids are imported into VA, and this is currently only allowed in rare circumstances by Department regulation (see column C), then a VA Dept. of Ag and Consumer Services (VDACS) health certificate is required. Ban on importation of live cervids into VA and prohibition of the intrastate movement of cervids unless specifically allowed by the VDWR. Exotic cervids may be imported, following TB/brucellosis testing, into VA on a case-by-case basis to a permitted exhibitor who is the sole possessor of a cervid species.  Deer to be moved must be from an AZA accredited facility in a state without pertinent diseases, such as TB, brucellosis, or CWD, in wild or captive deer. Exotic cervids may be moved within VA between permitted exhibitors on case-by-case basis pending negative TB/brucellosis tests and compliance with mandatory CWD testing requirements.  Transfer of embryos/semen  follow the same criteria as live deer movements. Deer farming is no longer permitted in Virginia. Cervids may only be held in captivity with a valid VDWR permit (e.g., exhibiitors, T&E, etc.).  Permit conditions for captve cervids mandate annual inspections, mandatory tagging, mandatory CWD testing of all adult mortalities, record keeping, etc.   Rehabilitation of deer that originate from within a Disease Management Area is prohibited. Statewide rehabilitation of elk and adult deer prohibited.  See other columns for additional management actions in and near the CWD Disease Management Areas.   No DWR notification  and mandatory CWD testing of all adult deaths in all captive deer facilities required. Statewide surveillance of adult bucks in non-Disease Management Area counties conducted with the assistance of cooperating taxidermists.   Annual monitoring conducted in Disease Management Area 1 (Frederick, Clarke, Shenandoah, and Warren counties), Disease Management Area 2 (Culpeper, Fauquier, Loudoun, Madison, Orange, Page, and Rappahannock Counties), Disease Management Area 3 (Floyd, Montgomery, and Pulaksi counties) and in the elk restoration zone.  As of June 2021, 110 CWD-positive deer have been detected in Virginia. Not legal to bait for the purpose of taking an animal. Feeding of deer is prohibited year round in any county located within 25 miles of a CWD detection. It is also illegal year round to feed deer or elk in Buchanan, Dickenson, or Wise counties as part of elk restoration.  Elsewhere in the state, there is a year round ban on feeding deer on national forest lands and department-owned lands. Throughout the remainder of Virginia, there is a ban on feeding deer  from September 1 thru the first Saturday in January.  It is also illegal to feed cervids during any deer hunting season in any city, town, or county in the state that allows deer/elk hunting;and any area is considered "baited" for 10 days after the removal of feed.  Cities or towns may pass ordinances to prohibit feeding of deer. It is illegal to possess and use afield for the purposes of hunting any lures or attractants that contain natural deer urine, gland secretions, or other bodily fluids.   This is a statewide ban. Whole cervid carcasses and carcass parts containing spinal or brain tissue from any cervid originating from outside Virginia are prohibited from entering Virginia. The following carcass parts  may be imported and possessed: cleaned jaw bones, boned-out meat , quarters or other portions of meat w/ no part of the spinal column or skull attached, hides or capes with no skull attached, clean (no meat or tissue attached) antlers or skulls/skull plates w/wo antlers attached, upper canine teeth (buglers, whistlers or ivories), & finished taxidermy products.  Whole deer carcasses and carcass parts containing brain or spinal tissue from deer killed in a Disease Management Area (DMA) cannot be exported out of the the same DMA CA, except those parts currently allowed under the carcass importation regulation noted above. Hunters are encouraged to dispose of unused portion of deer originating from a DMA in a lined landfill  or dumpster.   No Yes
Washington The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) regulates the importation and possession of captive cervids. Both WDFW and the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) regulate the disease testing requirements for captive cervids. WDFW contact: Dr. Kristin Mansfield, kristin.mansfield@dfw.wa.gov; WSDA contact: Dr. Amber Itle, amber.itle@agr.wa.gov  Captive cervid farms, except formally permitted fallow deer and reindeer farms, were prohibited in 1993. In addition to standard regulations, cervids must be tested for tuberculosis, brucellosis, and certain Parelaphostrongylus and Elaphostrongylus species before entering the state. NA No NA WDFW began limited testing for CWD in 1995 and, with additional federal funding provided specifically for CWD testing, conducted intensive surveillance for CWD from 2001-2011. Since that time, CWD testing in Washington has been focused on animals showing clinical signs consistent with the disease. Beginning Fall 2021 WDFW will initiate systematic CWD in defined areas of the state nearest to the known CWD detections in other states. Baiting is legal, but rule changes in 2016 established a 10-gallon limit on the amount of bait hunters can make available to attract deer and elk, and prohibits establishing bait piles closer than 200 yards apart. (apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=232-12-245)
 
Public feeding is discouraged, but not banned.  Some feeding is done by the state to prevent chronic elk-related agriculture depredation specific to the Yakima elk herd area. It is unlawful to import most cervid parts from states where CWD has been found in wild animals.  As of April 2019 this includes:                                                                                                                                      Alberta, Canada; Saskatchewan, Canada; Arkansas; Colorado; Illinois; Iowa, Kansas; Maryland; Michigan, Minnesota; Mississippi; Missouri; Montana; Nebraska; New Mexico; New York; North Dakota; Pennsylvania; South Dakota; Tennessee, Texas; Utah; Virginia; West Virginia; Wisconsin; and Wyoming.                                                                                                       Exceptions include: meat that has been deboned in the state/province where it was harvested, with the bones being prohibited from importation; tissue-free skulls, antlers and upper canine teeth; hides or capes without heads attached; tissue imported for use by a diagnostic or research lab; and finished taxidermy mounts.  If an importer or recipient of a deer or elk is notified by the originating state or province that the animal tested positive for CWD, the WDFW must be notified within 24 hours. No No
West Virginia WV Department of Agriculture (WVDA) Contact: Cervid Program Manager, Dr. Erika Alt, ealt@wvda.us, 304-538-2397 or Program Records Analyst, Shelly Lantz, slantz@wvda.us, 304-558-2214 Captive cervid facilities may only receive captive cervids from TB and Brucellosis Accredited herds; must complete application for importation; may not originate from any state diagnosed with TB. All captive cervids must have two forms of ID. One official ID and one unique marker visible and identifiable. The WVDA prohibits the intrastate movement of captive cervids from Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, and Morgan counties to other captive cervid facilties. The WVDA allows importation from only states with approved USDA APHIS CWD Herd Certification Programs that meet the WVDA CWD Herd Certification Program standards. In addition, No captive cervid facility shall receive a captive cervid from an out-of-state facility which is located within a 15 mile radius of a confirmed CWD positive cervid in the last 60 months. No WVDA surveillance program is mandatory and requires testing of all mortality of captive cervids >12 months old. Hunting Preserves must provide an annual minimum of 30 cervids or 10 percent of the dispatched cervids, whichever is less for CWD sampling. WV DNR conducts statewide surveillance using a stratified sample of road kills initiated in 2002 and continues at present. Monitoring within the CWD Containment/Management Area which includes Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, and Morgan counties, consists primarily of samples from hunter harvested deer. Surveillance outside this area is primarily quota driven samples from road kill deer. Baiting ban in Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, and Morgan counties.  It is illegal to bait  any wildlife on public land statewide at any time.  Baiting is discouraged but not banned on private land in remaining 48 counties. Deer feeding banned in Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, and Morgan counties (except song and insectivorous birds may be fed, provided that such feeding shall not cause, or be done in a manner that would be reasonably anticipated to cause, a congregation of cervids or other wildlife). It is illegal to feed any wildlife  on public land statewideat any time.  Feeding is discouraged but not restricted in remaining 48 counties. Importation of cervid carcasses and carcass parts from a state or province or a designated CWD Containment or Disease Management Area which has diagnosed chronic wasting disease  or from captive cervid facilities in any state or province is prohibited, except the meat from which all bones have been removed, the cape, the antlers or antlers and skull plate from which all meat or tissue has been removed, cervid canines, and finished taxidermy heads may be  imported.  Hunters in West Virginia are prohibited from transporting dead cervids or their parts beyond the boundary of 5 counties in the CWD Containment Area which includes all of Berkeley,Hampshire, Hardy, Mineral and Morgan counties except for the folowing: meat that has been boned out, quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, cleaned hide with no head attached, clean skull plate with antlers attached, antlers with no meat or tissue attached, and finished taxidermy mounts. Hunters may transport whole cervid carcasss that were not killed inside Berkeley, Hampshire, Hardy, Mineral, and Morgan counties through the containment area. Yes Yes
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection registers and regulates captive deer farms and regulates importation of all farmed cervids.   Contact at DATCP Dr. Amy Horn-Delzer, Amy.HornDelzer@wisconsin.gov 608-224-4886. The Department of Natural Resources certifies and monitors fencing for farmed white tailed deer. Contact Peter Dunn, DNR at 608-317-8417 Current CVI and import permit is required. Contact 608-224-4874  or visit https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/Programs_Services/DeerElkCervidMvmt.aspx for detailed information.  Captive cervids are only permitted in herds registered with DATCP.  1) Imports only from herds with 5 years of CWD monitoring status under a state/federally approved CWD certification program. TB and brucellosis herd status required. 2) Movement intrastate only from herds enrolled in state monitoring program with at least 5 years of monitoring status. 3) Herds enrolled in the state CWD monitoring program have census and inventory requirements.  4) Mandatory testing on all dead/harvested farm-raised deer 12 months or over for herds enrolled in CWD Herd Status Program. Surveillance testing required for herds not enrolled in state monitoring program for dead/harvested deer 16 months or over.  5) Owners must report escapes within 24 hours. 6) Owners must report signs of CWD within 24 hours to a veterinarian. 7) Hunting Ranches must be registered and have at least 80 acres within the fenced area . 8) All deer being imported and those moving intrastate must have 2 ID's, one being official and the other being either official or unique to the herd. All deer going into a hunting ranch (not naturally born there) must have 2 IDs -- one visible ear tag and the other may be an ear tag or an implanted chip. Details on specific regulations may be found here: https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/Programs_Services/DeerFarms.aspx No significant new rules in development. CWD enrolled herds with less than 5 years of status must test all deer 12 months of age or older that die for any reason. CWD enrolled herds with 5 or more years of status must test all deer that die or are killed and 25% of deer slaughtered at a slaughter facility 12 months of age or older. Non-enrolled herds must test deer that are at least 16 months of age or older at the following rate: all that die or are found dead, 50% that are killed intentionally or hunted and 25% of those that are shipped to slaughter at a slaughter facility. There is no charge to hunters for testing their deer, but testing is not available in all parts of the state every year. If no sampling location is available nearby, hunters can contact a local biologist to arrange sampling. Over 265,000 wild deer have been tested statewide since 1999, with over 8,100 testing positive, the majority were detected in the Southern Farmland Zone in the southern part of the state.  From April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021, Wisconsin sampled 18,896 deer, with 1,578 of those testing postive. Baiting regulation is under the direction of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Under state statute 29.336, Wis. Stats, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is required to enact a ban on the baiting and feeding of deer in any county within 10 miles of a captive or free-roaming deer that tests positive for either CWD or Bovine Tuberculosis (Tb). In August 2017, an Act signed into law to amend current state statute did the following: remove deer baiting and feeding prohibitions in counties where 36 months have passed since any confirmed positive test for chronic wasting disease or bovine tuberculosis (Tb) within the county; and remove deer baiting and feeding prohibitions in adjacent counties where 24 months have passed since any confirmed positive test for chronic wasting disease or bovine tuberculosis (Tb) within a 10-mile radius of the county. The 24/36-month period would start over again with each new positive test result as they are confirmed. Please check the WI DNR baiting and feeding webpage frequently for updates, as new baiting and feeding bans may be enacted. Where baiting is not prohibited, it is restricited such that individulal hunters may place only 2 gallons of bait per 40 acres of land and no bait site may be within 100 yards of another established bait site. Cervid feeding regulation is under the direction of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Under state statute 29.336, Wis. Stats, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is required to enact a ban on the baiting and feeding of deer in any county within 10 miles of a captive or free-roaming deer that tests positive for either CWD or Bovine Tuberculosis (Tb). In August 2017, an Act signed into law to amend current state statute did the following: remove deer baiting and feeding prohibitions in counties where 36 months have passed since any confirmed positive test for chronic wasting disease or bovine tuberculosis (Tb) within the county; and remove deer baiting and feeding prohibitions in adjacent counties where 24 months have passed since any confirmed positive test for chronic wasting disease or bovine tuberculosis (Tb) within a 10-mile radius of the county. The 24/36-month period would start over again with each new positive test result as they are confirmed. Please check the WI DNR baiting and feeding webpage frequently for updates, as new baiting and feeding bans may be enacted.
Where feeding is not prohibited, it is restrcited such that individual hunters may place only 2 gallons of bait per 40 acres of land and no bait site may be within 100 yards of another established bait site.
Carcass movement reguation is under the direction of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Please check the WI DNR carcass movement webpage for a complete outline of carcass movement restrictions. The movement of both whole wild-deer carcasses and certain parts of those carcasses from a CWD-affected county (a county with either a wild or captive animal that has been confirmed to be positive for CWD in the county or portion of the county is within a 10-mile radius of a wild or captive animal that has been confirmed to be positive for CWD) is restricted. Carcasses can only be moved within these counties and an adjacent county. However, hunters are allowed to take whole cervid carcasses or any parts of carcasses harvested in the CWD-affected counties or in any state or province where CWD has been found, into any part of Wisconsin, provided the carcass (or nonexempt parts) are taken to a licensed taxidermist or meat processor within 72 hours of registering a Wisconsin deer, or within 72 hours of entering Wisconsin from another state. Only the following parts of wild cervids are exempt from these regulations:
• Meat that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately)
• Quarters or other portions of meat to which no part of the spinal column is attached
• Meat that has been deboned
• Hides with no heads attached
• Finished taxidermy heads
• Antlers with no tissue attached
• Clean skull plates with no lymphoid or brain tissue attached
• Clean skulls with no lymphoid or brain tissue attached
• Upper canine teeth (also known as buglers, whistlers, or ivories)
CWD has been diagnosed in 34 Wisconsin captive cervid premises. The first was confirmed in 2002, the latest in 2021. Nineteen farms that have had a positive CWD cervid have been depopulated as of April 2021. Two CWD infected slaughter only or exhibition farms and 8 hunting ranches currently are allowed to continue to operate as no live deer leave the premises. For details of CWD in captive cervids in WI, go to https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/Programs_Services/FarmRaisedDeer.aspx Yes - 8,174 positive free-ranging white-tailed deer have been identified in Wisconsin since 2001. Of the 72 counties, 33 currently have CWD detected in the wild deer herd.
Wyoming The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) has jurisdiction over import and possession of cervids.  WGFD contact: Samantha Allen (samantha.allen@wyo.gov) 1) Certificate of veterinary inspection 2) negative brucellosis test withn 30 days, 3) negative TB test within 90 days, 4) statement that no animal on the premise of origin is known to be infected with or to be exposed to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, 5) 60 day quarantine prior to entry with 2 negative baermann tests for Elaphostrongylinae parasites and 2 negative fecal sedimentations for large american liver flukes 6) 180 day quarantine post entry with negative baermann fecals for Elaphostrongylinae parasites every 30 days 7) must originate from herds CWD free for at least 5 years 8) free of ticks, mites, and lice 9) all elk must be genetically tested for hybridization and test as pure rocky mountain elk. 10) WGFD import permit. No imports of cervids unless they come from monitored herds free of CWD for at least 5 years. New CWD management plan adopted in April, 2016. Captive cervids are not allowed; single exemption allowed; single exempted ranch has opted not to import any cervid. no mandatory testing for single exempted ranch. Preliminary research based surveillence from 1982-1996. Agency hunter-harvested, targeted, and road-kill surveillance in deer, elk, and moose since 1997.  Testing done by WGFD Wildlife Health Laboratory.  Over 53,000 samples tested by 2016. Testing is voluntary and free if samples taken by WGFD personnel. The department may issue baiting permits to landowners for specific sites on private land where conditions exist which are limiting the ability to take big game animals for the purpose of addressing damage to private property, human safety, disease issues, or population management. Wyoming Statute 23-3-304:
(d) No person shall place any bait for the purpose of taking a big game animal nor shall any person knowingly take a big game animal by the use of any bait that has been deposited, placed, distributed or scattered in a manner to constitute a lure, attraction or enticement to, on or over the area where any hunter is taking big game animals. Nothing in this subsection shall:

(i) Apply to normal or accepted agricultural management practices;
(ii) Prohibit taking big game animals over stored and standing crops, salt, mineral or other feed scattered solely as a result of normal and accepted agricultural practices;
(iii) Apply to the placement, distribution, depositing or scattering of bait, as approved by the game and fish commission, for the taking of big game animals by any legally blind person, person confined to a wheelchair or person hunting with a license issued pursuant to W.S. 23-1-705(j);
(iv) Apply to the placement, distribution, depositing or scattering of bait for the taking of big game animals in hunt areas to address population management, damage, disease or human safety issues. The commission shall promulgate rules and regulations governing the provisions of this paragraph.

(e) As used in subsection (d) of this section, "bait" means the direct or indirect placing, exposing, depositing, distributing or scattering of salt, hay, grain, fruit, nuts or chemical, mineral or other feed as an attraction or enticement for big game animals, regardless of the kind and quantity. A chemical used as an attractant or mask rather than for consumption shall not be considered "bait".

 
SECTION 1:   Supplemental Feeding of Certain Wild Animals Prohibited

A.                    Definitions.
1.         Supplement feed attractants. "Supplement feed attractants" are any human food, pet food, including pelleted forage feed, hay, block salt, forage product or mineral supplements, grain, seed or birdseed, garbage, and other food sources and attractants, but does not included incidental food sources such as lawns and gardens.

2.         Agricultural.  For the purposes of this section "agricultural" means the science or art of cultivating the soil, producing crops, boarding and/or raising permitted livestock.

B.        Prohibition.  No person shall knowingly or intentionally provide supplemental feed attractants to the following wild animals, unless specifically authorized by an agency of either the State of Wyoming or the United States of America; antelope, deer, elk, moose, turkey, ducks, non-domestic geese, bobcat, bear, mountain lion, coyote, fox, raccoon, wolf and skunks.

C.        Exemptions.  A person engaged in any of the following activities is not subject to liabilities under this section:
1.         A person engaged in the normal feeding of livestock;
2.         A person pursuing an agricultural purpose on agricultural land as defined by Wyoming Statues §39-13-101 (a)(iii);
3.         A person engaged in the practice of raising crops and crop aftermath, including hay, alfalfa and grains, produced, harvested, stored or fed to domestic livestock in accordance with normal agricultural practices;
4.         A person engaged in the cultivation of a lawn or garden;
5.         A person engaged in bird feeding using a feeder designed to limit access by the animals specified in paragraph B of this Section; and
6.         Any health department employee, law enforcement officer or a state or federal game official acting within the scope of his/her official duties.
Importation into Wyoming of any deer, elk, or moose taken from any state, province, or country within areas designated as positive for CWD is restricted-such animal carcasses may only be transported into Wyoming to a private residence for processing, to a taxidermist, to a processor, or to a CWD sample collection site in Wyoming provided the head and all portions of the spinal column are disposed of in an approved landfill.  Within Wyoming, transport of deer, elk, or moose taken or possessed from any hunt area in Wyoming to another hunt area within Wyoming or any other state, province or country is restricted-such animal carcasses may only be transported in Wyoming to a camp, a private residence for processing, to a taxidermist, to a processor, or to a CWD sample collection site in Wyoming provided the head and all portions of the spinal column remain at the site of the kill or are disposed of in any approved landfill in Wyoming.
 
No Yes - white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, and moose
Federal, Canada The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Contact: Rachel McPhie; Rachel.mcphie@Inspection.gc.ca The CFIA has jurisdiction over captive cervids in all provinces/territories under the Health of Animals Act & Regulations regarding federally reportable diseases (CWD, TB, Brucellosis, etc.). The CFIA manages the national CWD control program for captive cervids, and the national standards and audit portions of the CWD herd certification program (CWD-HCP). In addition, all cervid movements in Canada require a movement permit issued by the CFIA. The CFIA has updated its national CWD disease control program, and reviews the national standards for the  herd certification program on an annual basis. CFIA's federal import requirements for live cervids from the USA were updated in October of 2017. CFIA is the National Administrator for the national CWD herd certification program  https://www.inspection.gc.ca/animal-health/terrestrial-animals/diseases/reportable/cwd/herd-certification/eng/1330187841589/1330187970925 The CWD herd certiciatoin program requires testing of  all cervids 12 months of age and older that have died or been killed for any reason.  CFIA's National Reference Labartoary for CWD performs all confirmatory testing in Canada.  CFIA National Reference Laboratory for CWD performs all confirmatory testing in Canada.  NA NA NA CWD has been found in capive cervids in Alberta and Saskatchewan and Quebec CWD has been found in free -ranging cervids in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Alberta, Canada Provincial contact for captive cervids: Animal Health and Assurance Branch: Dr. Keith Lehman, Chief Provincial Veterinarian, e-mail: keith.lehman@gov.ab.ca, Ph 780-427-6406.


 
Provincial regulations allow the raising of elk, white-tailed deer, mule deer and moose. Cervid farming is closely regulated. Farms are inspected and issued a license every five years. Animals must have official identification. A provincial database records all animal inventories and movements that are reported by the farmers and audited by the province.
Import protocols are in place to decrease the risk of importing cervids that carry CWD or other diseases of concern for the province.
Alberta Mandatory CWD Surveillance Program in captive cervids since 2002. Also, mandatory submission of hunter-killed deer heads in  designated CWD surveillance areas.  The Alberta Mandatory CWD Program has been in place since 2002. It was reviewed and updated in 2011. The principles of the program remain unchanged.

In follow up to changes in federal CWD control programs, Alberta will implement control measures under the provincial Animal Health Act for control of the disease on farms that will no longer fall under federal controls. The program will include ordering animals from positive premises to slaughter and restocking restrictions for positive premises.
Mandatory surveillance on all deaths of captive cervids over 1 year of age including slaughter from August 2002 to present. Before that time, voluntary surveillance was conducted on captive cervids between October of 1996 and August of 2002.   Link to surveillance results: https://www.alberta.ca/mandatory-chronic-wasting-disease-surveillance-program.aspx  Ongoing surveillance on wild cervids since fall 1996 - primarily hunter-kills plus clinical cases and road kills. The first positive wild deer was found in September 2005; the first positive hunter-kill  was shot in December 2005.  The Fish and Wildlife Division uses increased fall hunting opportunities in designated CWD risk areas to monitor occurrence and spread of CWD.  Mandatory submission of deer heads is required in designated high risk areas. To get an update on CWD on wild cervids, please visit: alberta.ca/cwd No baiting of cervids allowed. No ban at this time. In 2008 the Fish and Willdlife Division initiated voluntary carcass handling and transportation guidelines in CWD risk areas and in conjunction with carcasses coming to Alberta from CWD risk areas outside the province.   One elk herd and one WTD herd in 2002, two elk herds in 2015, one elk herd in 2016, and one elk herd in 2018.  In 2019, one elk herd and two white tail deer herds (linked) have had positive detections. In 2020, CWD detected in ten elk farms in seven separate investigations (three linked to other detections). In 2021, CWD detected on two premises (farmed elk). Primarily mule deer, with spillover documented in white-tailed deer, a few elk, and moose. Details available at alberta.ca/cwd 
British Columbia, Canada Provincial contact for captive cervids: Plant and Animal Health Branch: Dr. Rayna Gunvaldsen, Executive Director Plant and Animal Health Branch, Chief Veterinary Officer, e-mail: rayna.gunvaldsen@gov.bc.ca, Ph 604-556-3013.

 
Prohibition of live cervid imports since 1980's. BC Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (FLNRORD)  has jurisdiction over free ranging cervids. The BC Wildlife Act has a regulation to prevent the import of live cervids or cervid parts harvested outside of BC and has a regulation to prevent the use of cervid biological materials as scents and attracants. BC has implemented a new condition to the general hunting licence (resident and non-resident) requiring submission of mule deer and white-tailed deer heads, harvested from a defined high-risk area, for CWD testing.   No game farming of native cervids in BC: fallow deer and reindeer only; Intra-provincial animal movements are controlled by the Ministry of Agriculture.  FLNRORD leads a Provincial CWD Advisory Committee and two regional working groups of relevant government agencies, First Nations and stakeholders that collaboratively provide input on CWD program delivery. A new hunting licence condition has been approved (Jan 2021) for mandatory submission of deer heads for testing.  New ban on baiting ungulates in the Kootenay Region (SE BC). Additional regulatory amendments are being considered for the 2021 season. The Surveillance and Response Plan for CWD in BC (June 2019)  is available online: www.gov.bc.ca/chronicwastingdisease. All CWD testing of captive cervids is voluntary. Majority of testing is voluntary. Mandatory submission of white-tailed deer and mule deer in specific managament units (representing high risk areas of BC). Surveillance is focused in high risk areas adjacent to CWD positive jurisdictions. All cervids submitted to the program are tested. Samples are mainly from hunters but include road kills, opportunitistic mortalities and euthanized animals. Sampling of wild cervids began in 2001, with over 6000 animals tested and no positives to date.   New regulation bans the baiting and feeding of wild ungulates in the Kootenay Region (SE BC). Consultation is underway to expand  regulation to include all of BC. The use of scents and attractants is restricted to synthetic products.  Under the BC Wildlife Act it is an offense to use any part or derivative of a deer, elk, moose or caribou if the part or derivative originated from outside of BC.
 
New regulation bans the baiting and feeding of wild ungulates in the Kootenay Region (SE BC). Consultation is underway to expand regulation to include all of BC. Not common practice to supplemental feed in BC, primarily used for emergency feeding in winter. Authorized under permit only.  It is prohibited to import intact deer, elk, moose or caribou carcasses into BC from another jurisdiction. The carcass must be processed so that high risk material is left behind. High risk material includes the head, hide, hoof, spinal column, internal organ or mammary gland of cervids that were killed outside of BC. Meats as well as hide, antlers and skulls that have all soft tissues removed are permitted. Consultation is underway to expand the regulation to include prohibting the import of bones.  No No
Manitoba, Canada Farmed Elk - Manitoba Agriculture; Contact:nelson.bowley@gov.mb.ca   Other Cervids - Manitoba Sustainable Development; Contact: richard.davis@gov.mb.ca Regulations regarding importation of farmed elk set out in Livestock Diverstification Act incuding a ban on elk from any jurisdiction where CWD was diagnosed within past five (5) years.  Prohibit importation of native and exotic cervids.   Ban on the possession of any product that contains urine, feces, saliva or scent glands of a cervid.  Ban on feeding cervids to include all areas adjacent to jurisdictions where CWD is present in wild cervids. Manitoba is currently reviewing all relevant Regulations and Action Plans including cervid and cervid part imports, surveillance zones, risk assessments and responses.  Department is considering increasing ban on cervid imports to include all cervid carcasses and parts.  Mandatory sample submission area has increased to include Game Hunting Area 27 and voluntary sample submissions along MB-US border. Mandatory CWD testing program on all ranched cervid deaths. By regulation, all elk and deer harvested in Game Hunting Areas 5, 6, 6A, 11, 12, 13, 13A, 18 and 18B west of PR 366, 18A, 18C, that part of 22 west of PTH 83, and 27 must be presented for testing.  This area is that part of Manitoba adjacent to west central Saskatchewan where CWD has been spreading eastward in both farmed and wild elk and deer. As well, the Departnment will test samples from cervids submitted volunatarily along the MB-US border.  A scenario based Action Plan has been developed in preparation for any discoveries through hunter supplied sample surveillance. Approximately 300 - 1,000 wildlife samples are tested annually. Baiting of cervids for hunting purposes is prohibited.   Illegal to hunt within 0.8 km of a substance that is acting as a cervid bait. Feeding wild cervids for any purposes is banned in Game Hunting Areas 5, 6, 6A, 11, 12, 13, 13A, 18, 18A, 18B, 18C, that part of 22 west of Provincial Trunk Highway 83, 23, 23A, and 27.  Conservation Officers given authority to order the removal of any cervid attractant that poses a risk to wildlife, livestock, or persons. Ban on the importation of hunter harvested cervids from any province, territory or country without first removing head, hide, hooves, mammary glands, entrails, internal organs and spinal column.  Antlers and connecting bone plates allowed if disinfected and all other hide and tissue are removed.  Capes allowed but must be immediately chemically processed into a tanned product.   Possession of any product that contains urine, feces, saliva or scent glands of a cervid is prohibited.  No No
New Brunswick, Canada Permit for captive wildlife issued by Minister of Natural Resources DNRED is not authorizing permits to establish new captive wildlife facilities for the farming of any exotic ungulate species. No regulations No Testing of captive cervids under jurisdiction of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. High risk animals tested. In last 5 years have tested 15 animals, all negative. No No, but strongly encourage public not to feed deer. No, but permit is required to move, sell, or barter any wildlife or wildlife parts. No No
Northwest Territories*, Canada Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Heather Sayine-Crawford: heather_sayine-crawford@gov.nt.ca NWT Wildlife Act & Regulations:  Game Farm License, Permit to Import Live Vertebrates  Recent updates to Phase II of the Wildlife Act include a requirement to provide negative CWD results for import of materials other than boned out meat harvested > 100 km from the NWT border. Import of live white-tailed deer and mule deer is prohibited.   New Wildlife Act for the Northwest Territories came into force in 2014 and updates came into effect on July 1, 2019.  Regulations pertaining  to wildlife and animal health issues still being considered.   NA Periodic opportunistic and hunter-based incentive program sampling of wild cervids for CWD testing. Total tested as of 2019 (includes historical data); boreal caribou: 4; moose: 71; barren ground caribou:153 ; white-tailed deer: 8) Yes; No person shall, without a permit, set out or use bait to attract big game or other prescribed wildlife. Yes; Subject to subsection (2), no person shall intentionally feed big fame, fur-bearers or other prescribed wildlife. Yes, no person shall import into or transport in the Northwest Territories dead wildlife that is prescribed as a potential carrier of a disease or other condition, or prescribed parts or derivatives of such wildlife, unless the person is permitted, in accordance with the regulations, to import or tranpsort it. As of July 1, 2019, under The Wildlife Act, anyone who wants to import carcasses and certain parts (e.g. urine, taxidermied mounts) (i.e. everything other than boned out meat) must be able to provide proof of negative CWD status if the animals are harvested > 100 km from the NWT border.  No No
Nova Scotia*, Canada Wildlife Division, Department of Natural Resources, 136 Exibition St, Kentville Nova Scotia  B4N 4E5   Peter MacDonald  902-679-6140     macdonpr@gov.ns.ca No importation of live cervids allowed. Farming of cervid animals is regulated under the Wildlife Act. See https://www.Novascotia.ca/just/regulations/regs/WIdeerf.htm No regulations in place specific to CWD NA Any suspicious illnesses or mortalities would be tested for CWD.  Nothing to date. Would be conducted through the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre at University of Prince Edward Island. No No No person shall, while in a wildlife habitat, possess or use a product that contains or purports to contain any body part of a member of the deer family, including urine, blood, or other fluids. No No
Ontario, Canada Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has jurisdiction over captive cervids in all provinces/territories under the Health of Animals Act & Regulations regarding reportable diseases (CWD, TB, Brucellosis, …).  Dr. Balroop Nanhar, balroop.nahar@inspection.gc.ca

Provincial jurisdiction over farmed cervids is with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA).  Dr. Alexandra Reid, alexandra.reid@ontario.ca 

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) has jurisdiction over non-captive wildlife except migratory birds.     Chris Heydon (policy), chris.heydon@ontario.ca    Larissa Nituch (surveillance lead), larissa.nituch@ontario.ca    Jolanta Kowalski (media contact), jolanta.kowalski@ontario.ca        
Effective January 1, 2021, the import of all species of live captive cervids into Ontario is prohibited, unless authorized by an MNRF-issued permit. This includes importing from other provinces, territories, or US states.  In addition, the movement and transportation of live captive cervids between points within Ontario is prohibited, unless authorized by an MNRF-issued permit.  Effective January 1, 2021, the import of all species of live captive cervids into Ontario is prohibited, unless authorized by an MNRF-issued permit. This includes importing from other provinces, territories, or US states.  In addition, the movement and transportation of live captive cervids between points within Ontario is prohibited, unless authorized by an MNRF-issued permit.  There is a general prohibition on the possession of most parts of cervids harvested in other jurisdictions. N/A                                                                                                                        The Canadian Sheep Federation is the Regional Administrator of the CFIA's voluntary herd certification program for Ontario cervid producers.                                                                                                                        OMAFRA oversees voluntary CWD surveillance for farmed cervids. The Ontario CWD Surveillance Project for Farmed Cervids was launched from April 1, 2006 in an attempt to increase the level of CWD surveillance in farmed cervids. As of March 14, 2018, an additional 2,172 farmed cervids have been tested. Since 1998 a total of 3,116 farmed cervids have been tested. All results to date have been negative for CWD. In July of 2019 the voluntary surveillance program was replaced with targeted surveillance at high risk provincial abattoirs targeting non-VHCP producers, as well as still facilitating testing for VHCP producers at all locations. This program tested 114 cervid samples. Based on the targeted surveillance, as of January 1 2021 testing of all cervids at provincial abattoirs started and currently 276 have been tested as of September 22 2021. Annual CWD surveillance and opportunistic sampling has resulted in the testing of approximately 13,667 wild cervids (to April 2021) since CWD testing began in 2002. To date, all samples have been negative for CWD. Each year Ontario conducts surveillance in geographic areas identified as high risk for CWD detection by computer modelling. No; province is increasing awareness through communications of potential risk of CWD transmission if detected in Ontario related to baiting for wild, hunted cervids. A policy-level review of wildlife baiting and feeding is ongoing. No; province is increasing awareness or potential risk of CWD transmission if detected in Ontario related to feeding wild deer and elk through communications; province now discourages feeding deer except in emergency situations triggered by a snow depth index of winter severity.  It is common practice for people to feed deer / bait for the purposes of hunting. A policy-level review of wildlife feeding is ongoing, with regard to disease transmission implications from wildlife feeding. Yes; effective Jan. 1 2021 new regulations restrict import and possession of most parts of harvested cervids from other jurisdictions. Only cut and package meat, tanned hides, finished taxidermy mounts, skulls and antlers cleaned of all tissue may be brought into Ontario. Exemption for temporary transport through Ontario to another destination if sealed in container. Use and possession for any purpose of lures, scents or attractants made from cervids is prohibited. No No
Prince Edward Island*, Canada Agriculture & Forestry  ( Fish & Wildlife section)   chuck Gallison   cegallison@gov.pe.ca Game Farm and Keeping of Wildlife in Captivitiy regs Canadian Food inspection agency NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
Quebec, Canada

The Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs (MFFP) is in charge of carrying out the Act respecting the conservation and development of wildlife (R.S.Q., c. C-61.1) over captive and free ranging cervids.
Contact: Isabelle Laurion, isabelle.laurion@mffp.gouv.qc.ca

The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ) is in charge of carrying out the Food Products Act (chapter P-29) and the Animal Health Protection Act (R.S.Q., c. P-42) over captive cervids.
Contact: Isabelle McKenzie, isabelle.mckenzie@mapaq.gouv.qc.ca.
 
Transportation authorization permit (TAP) must be issued by CFIA before animals are moved. In April 2001, the Regulation respecting the health certification of imported animals (R.S.Q., c. P-42), enacted by Order in Council, made it mandatory for operators to have a certificate for all farmed cervids imported into Quebec issued by the chief veterinarian or other competent officer of the province or of the country of origin attesting that the animals do not have CWD. To bolster the Regulation, in June 2001, MAPAQ established an import protocol according to which importers must have prior authorization to import cervids into Quebec from  the Direction de la santé des animaux (DSA).
On February 26, 2009, the Regulation respecting the identification and traceability of certain animals has been amended to include cervids. No live cervid may be moved from one facility to another if it is kept at a site within 100 km of where CWD was detected. Only travel to the slaughterhouse remains possible.
NA Since february 2018, the Canadian Sheep Federation is the Regional Administrator of the CFIA's voluntary herd certification program for Québec cervid producers.      
MAPAQ conducts a CWD abattoir surveillance.The monitoring in slaughter-houses under provincial inspection started in september 2007 and in slaughter-houses under federal inspection started in april 2010.

Between 2009 and 2020, 19 863 farmed cervids were tested.
A total of 388 free ranging white-tailed deer have been opportunistically tested from 2000-2006. In October 2007, MFFP began a structured surveillance program using mainly road-killed deer sampling in the southern part of the province. From October 2007 to December 2013 the program led to the collection of more than 4 400 free ranging white-tailed deer. Since 2011, the CWD surveillance relies mainly on hunters harvested white-tailed. Between 2011 and 2017, more than 4 800 samples were collected.
Since the disease was detected on a farm in September 2018, the MFFP has enhaced its CWD surveillance. Between 2018 and 2020, more than 12,200 wild cervids were analysed in the province, including more than 4,200 in a 45km radius from the affected farm. To date, all samples from wild cervid have been negative for CWD. 

Baiting for hunting purposes is permitted from September 1 to November 30 only, with the exception of mineral substances (eg, block of salt) which remain permitted year round.
MFFP recommends not to feed deer. As of January 2012, the possession of full carcasses or any part of the brain, spinal cord, eyes, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, tonsils, testicles or internal organs of cervids (except caribou) killed outside Québec is prohibited. That prohibition does not apply to the following body parts: boneless meat, quarters without pieces of spinal column or head attached, degreased or tanned skin and hide, antlers without velvet, disinfected skull plates without attached meat or tissue, teeth without attached meat or tissue and any piece mounted by a taxidermist. Since September 2018, those same restictions apply for the possession of body parts of cervid (wild or captive) killed within a 45km radius around the farm were the CWD cases were detected.
The use of natural cervid urine for hunting purposes is prohibited at all times, regardless of its origin, with the exception of the moose urine. This prohibition also applies to any other natural scent lures from deer (eg, tarsal glands).
Yes, one farm in 2018. No others had been found since. No
Saskatchewan*, Canada Saskatchewan Agriculture has primary responsibility for farmed cervids: contact Dr. Stephanie Smith, CVO Veterinary Unit, Livestock Branch.  Saskatchewan Environment has primary authority for captive cervids held in zoos, and other non- game farm facilities. Also final authority for all cervid imports: contact Dr. Iga Stasiak; Fish, Wildlife and Lands Branch. Farmed Cervids: The Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations, 2019, at:
http://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Regulations/Regulations/A20-2R10.pdf
Requires licence to operate a game farm for the following species: elk, white-tailed deer, mule deer, WTD-mule deer hybrid, moose, fallow deer, reindeer/caribou,  antelope, big horn sheep, American thinhorn sheep, mouflon sheep, musk deer, and mountain goat.  The regulations require minimum fence height, handling facilities, unique identification of animals (before 12 months of age; except fallow deer at ~14 months), accurate herd records / inventory, reporting of escapes and intrusions, reporting of movements by manifest or CFIA permit, mandatory CWD surveillance program, permits for import, slaughter processing requirements, and prohibit game farming for Sika deer; Red deer; and elk-Red deer hybrids.
Other Captive Cervids: The Wildlife Regulations, 1981 and The Captive Wildlife Regulations, at respectively:
http://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Regulations/Regulations/W13-1R1.pdf; and
http://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Regulations/Regulations/W13-1R13.pdf

Wildlife regulations allow wildlife to be held in captivity, with a licence, for the purpose of an operating zoo or commercial wildlife farm. Wildlife regulations also hold legislative authority for the issue of import permits for domestic game farm animals.
The Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations, 2019 require enrollment of licencees in the mandatory provincial CWD surveillance program.  All cervid deaths (≥ 12 months of age) must be reported and submitted for CWD testing, including slaughter animals.  Physical inventories are completed as required, annually under the current CWD surveillance program.  Imported cervids must originate from a herd with a documented history, at least, equivalent to a herd status of Level B, or above, on the National CWD Voluntary Herd Certification Program. Saskatchewan has developed import guidelines (written by Ministries of Agriculture and Environment) for evaluating the risk of importing domestic game farm animals from other jurisdictions.  Import requests are evaluated by both Ministries, with Environment having legislative authority to sign the import permit.


The Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations, 2019 came into force November 15, 2019. Changes include a fee for a game farm licence and the ability for the Minister to cancel or impose conditions on a game farm licence.

Changes to the Federal response to CWD in farmed cervids April 1, 2018 require  development of new provincial policies for  reponse to CWD-positive farmed cervids. Positive farms, when there is no federal response, are under provincial controls under The Animal Health Act, with no movements without provincial authorization. Depopulation is not ordered. Movement only to terminal premises or inspected slaughter. 
Saskatchewant's first detection of a CWD-positive farmed cervid was in 1996.  CWD became a federally reportable disease in 2001.  SK began a mandatory CWD surveillance program Dec 31-01; mandatory for all licencees, and associated farmed cervids, regulated under The Domestic Game Farm Animal Regulations, 2019.

Must report all deaths within 24 hours and submit samples for CWD testing from ALL cervids deaths (≥ 12 months of age), within 15 days.  Laboratory testing fees, for CWD, are paid by the province.  On-farm physical inventory and compliance assessment annually. Since January 2001 until December 31, 2020 a total of 61,176 farmed cervids have been tested for CWD. 
Saskatchewan operated a voluntary CWD hunter surveillance program from 1997 to 2012.  During this time, 45,434 wild cervids were tested (including targeted surveillance), with 387 CWD-positive animals found.  In 2014 and 2015, hunter surveillance was not offered; but, targeted samples of sick or dead animals were collected by conservation officers and collar-marked research animals were also tested.  Of these, 34/118 animals tested CWD-positive.

Voluntary testing of hunter submissions was restarted in 2015, and remains ongoing. Per-species CWD-positives vs total testing, included: mule deer (1373/31,281), white-tailed deer (386/19,517), elk (22/2,060), and moose (9/612).  In all, 53 470 animals have been tested since 1997 (31, 281 mule deer, 19, 517 white-tailed deer, 2060 elk, and 612 moose.

In 2020, 466 of 2703 animals tested, were CWD-positive as follows:  mule deer (335/1049), white-tailed deer (121/1326), elk (5/187), and moose (5/141).  The disease has not yet been detected in caribou.   CWD is now found in 56/83 wildlife management zones in the province and is considered endemic across the farmland south of the boreal forest. 

Data and mapping can be found at saskatchewan.ca/cwd.
No No No Yes Yes
Yukon*, Canada
Yukon Department of Environment has authority over captive and wild cervids in Yukon. Contact Chief Veterinary Officer - Mary VanderKop - 867-456-5582
Wildlife Act - Game Farm Regulations No regulations but a moratorium exists to prohibit the import of game farmed animals (elk are the only game farmed cervid in Yukon) and there is a prohibition against the import of cervids making exception for animals in transit through Yukon. Regulation enacted May 2, 2013 to prohibit the import of cervids that died or were killed outside Yukon with exemption for imports from Northwest Territories, Northern hunting zones in BC and for edible meat that is deboned or removed from spinal column and head, finished taxidermy mounts, teeth, antlers with No tissue and hide contained before delivery for processing. Exemption for carcasses in transit if contained (leak-proof).  Also prohibit possession, sale, import any product for hunting or trapping that contains cervid parts. Yes, mandatory program as condition of the Game Farm Licence to test all captive cervids. Yes - all harvested wild elk are tested (mandatory with hunting license) and road killed cervids are tested opportunitistically.  All negative to date. Not practiced here Not practiced here Regulation enacted May 2, 2013 to prohibit the import of cervids that died or were killed outside Yukon with exemption for imports from Northwest Territories, Northern hunting zones in BC and for edible meat that is deboned or removed from spinal column and head, finished taxidermy mounts, teeth, antlers with No tissue and hide contained before delivery for processing. Exemption for carcasses in transit if contained (leak-proof).  Also prohibit possession, sale, import any product for hunting or trapping that contains cervid parts. No No